ammunition


ammunition
/am'yeuh nish"euhn/, n.
1. the material fired, scattered, dropped, or detonated from any weapon, as bombs or rockets, and esp. shot, shrapnel, bullets, or shells fired by guns.
2. the means of igniting or exploding such material, as primers, fuzes, and gunpowder.
3. any material, means, weapons, etc., used in any conflict: a crude ammunition of stones.
4. information, advice, or supplies to help defend or attack a viewpoint, argument, or claim: Give me some ammunition for the debate.
5. Obs. any military supplies.
[1620-30; < MF amonitions, amunitions (pl.) military supplies (a- A-5 + munition < L; see MUNITION), or < F la munition, wrongly analyzed as l'amunition]

* * *

 the projectiles and propelling charges used in small arms, artillery, and other guns. Ammunition size is usually expressed in terms of calibre, which is the diameter of the projectile as measured in millimetres or inches. In general, projectiles less than 20 mm or .60 inch in diameter are classified as small-arm (small arm), and larger calibres are considered artillery. A complete round of ammunition consists of all the components necessary for one firing of the gun. These normally include a projectile, the propellant, and a primer that ignites the propellant. Other components such as cartridge case, fuze (fuse), and bursting charge are frequently included.

      In artillery ammunition, a fixed round is a complete round in which all components are securely joined by a cartridge case. (Though brass was used almost invariably for cartridge cases before World War II, it has since been largely superseded by steel.) In semifixed ammunition, the projectile is detachable from the cartridge case, an arrangement that allows for the size of the propelling charge to be adjusted, after which the projectile can be inserted loosely into the case. In separate-loading ammunition, a complete round consists of three components: the fuzed projectile, the propellant (in several combustile cloth bags), and the primer. This type of round is used in the largest-calibre guns because its separated components are easier to handle.

      Complete artillery rounds are further classified according to the type of projectile employed, such as high-explosive, armour-piercing, antipersonnel, nuclear, or chemical.

      Small-arms ammunition is always of the fixed type; complete rounds are usually called cartridges (cartridge), and projectiles are called bullets (bullet) (or shot in shotguns). Cartridge cases are most commonly made of brass, although steel is also widely used, and cases for shotgun pellets are made of brass and cardboard. The cases of most military rifles and machine guns have a bottleneck shape, allowing a small-calibre bullet to be fitted to a large propelling charge.

      The most common type of military small-arms ammunition is called general-purpose in Britain and ball in the United States. The bullet of this type usually consists of a steel or lead-alloy core encased in a jacket of copper alloy or of mild steel coated with a copper alloy. Special-purpose ammunition includes armour-piercing rounds, which fire bullets that have cores of hardened steel or some other metal such as tungsten carbide. Tracer bullets have a column of pyrotechnic composition in the base that is ignited by the flame of the propellant; this provides a visible pyrotechnic display during the bullet's flight. Incendiary bullets, intended to ignite flammable materials such as gasoline, contain a charge of chemical incendiary agent. See also bullet; cartridge; gunpowder; shell.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Ammunition — Am mu*ni tion, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ammunitioned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ammunitioning}.] To provide with ammunition. [1913 Webster] || …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ammunition — Am mu*ni tion, n. [F. amunition, for munition, prob. caused by taking la munition as l amunition. See {Munition}.] 1. Military stores, or provisions of all kinds for attack or defense. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. Articles used in charging firearms… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • ammunition — (n.) 1620s, from French soldiers faulty separation of M.Fr. la munition into l ammunition; from L. munitionem (nom. munitio) a fortifying (see MUNITION (Cf. munition)), and at first meaning all military supplies in general. The mistake in the… …   Etymology dictionary

  • ammunition — [am΄yo͞o nish′ən, am΄yənish′ən] n. [Fr amunition, by faulty separation of la munition: see MUNITIONS] 1. Obs. any military supplies 2. anything hurled by a weapon or exploded as a weapon, as bullets, gunpowder, shot, shells, bombs, grenades,… …   English World dictionary

  • Ammunition — (v. lat.), so v.w. Munition …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Ammunition — Ammunition, soviel wie Munition …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Ammunition — Ammunition, was Munition, Schießbedarf …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • ammunition — I noun apparatus belli, armament, armature, arms, ballistics, cartridges, charge, defense, deterrent, explosive, firearms, gunnery, gunpowder, materials of combat, means of attack, muniment, munition, panoply, propellants, provisions, weapons II… …   Law dictionary

  • ammunition — artillery, materiel, munitions, *armament, ordnance, arms …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • ammunition — [n] projectiles for weaponry ammo*, armament, ball, bomb, buckshot, bullet, cannonball, cartridge, charge, chemical, confetti*, explosive, fuse, grenade, gunpowder, iron rations*, materiel, missile, munition, napalm, powder, rocket, round, shell …   New thesaurus

  • ammunition — ► NOUN 1) a supply or quantity of bullets and shells. 2) points used to support one s case in argument. ORIGIN from French la munition the fortification …   English terms dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.