altitude sickness


altitude sickness
a condition affecting some persons at high altitudes, caused by insufficient oxygen in the blood and characterized by dizziness, nausea, and shortness of breath.
[1915-20]

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Acute reaction to a change from low altitudes to altitudes above 8,000 ft (2,400 m).

Most people gradually adapt, but some have a severe reaction that can be fatal unless they return to low altitude. Normal adaptations to the reduced oxygen at high altitude (e.g., breathlessness, racing heartbeat) are exaggerated; other manifestations include headache, gastrointestinal upsets, and weakness. Pulmonary edema is quickly reversed with oxygen and evacuation to a lower area.

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also called  mountain sickness 

      acute reaction to a change from sea level or other low-altitude environments to altitudes above 8,000 feet (2,400 metres). Altitude sickness was recognized as early as the 16th century. In 1878 French physiologist Paul Bert (Bert, Paul) demonstrated that the symptoms of altitude sickness are the result of a deficiency of oxygen in the tissues of the body. Mountain climbers, pilots, and persons living at high altitudes are the most likely to be affected.

      The symptoms of acute altitude sickness fall into four main categories: (1) respiratory symptoms such as shortness of breath upon exertion, and deeper and more rapid breathing; (2) mental or muscular symptoms such as weakness, fatigue, dizziness, lassitude, headache, sleeplessness, decreased mental acuity, decreased muscular coordination, and impaired sight and hearing; (3) cardiac symptoms such as pain in the chest, palpitations, and irregular heartbeat; and (4) gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea and vomiting. The symptoms usually occur within six hours to four days after arrival at high altitude and disappear within two to five days as acclimatization occurs. Although most people gradually recover as they adapt to the low atmospheric pressure of high altitude, some persons experience a reaction that can be severe and, unless they return to low altitude, possibly fatal.

      At higher altitudes, the air becomes thinner and the amount of breathable oxygen decreases. The lower barometric pressures of high altitudes lead to a lower partial pressure of oxygen in the alveoli, or air sacs in the lungs, which in turn decreases the amount of oxygen absorbed from the alveoli by red blood cells for transport to the body's tissues. The resulting insufficiency of oxygen in the arterial blood supply causes the characteristic symptoms of altitude sickness. The main protection against altitude sickness in aircraft is the use of pressurized air in cabins. Mountain climbers often use a mixture of pure oxygen and air to relieve altitude sickness while climbing high mountains. In addition, the prophylactic use of the diuretic acetazolamide initiated two to three days before ascent may prevent or mitigate acute altitude sickness.

      A more serious type of altitude sickness, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), occurs rarely among newcomers to altitude but more often affects those who have already become acclimated to high elevations and are returning after several days at sea level. In pulmonary edema, fluid accumulates in the lungs and prevents the victim from obtaining sufficient oxygen. The symptoms are quickly reversed when oxygen is given and the individual is evacuated to a lower area.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Altitude sickness — 1. Altitude sickness (or altitude illness) is a disorder caused by being at high altitude. It more commonly occurs above 8,000 feet (2,440 meters). The cause of altitude illness is a matter of oxygen physiology. At sea level the concentration of… …   Medical dictionary

  • altitude sickness — noun effects (as nosebleed or nausea) of oxygen deficiency in the blood and tissues at high altitudes • Hypernyms: ↑hypoxia • Hyponyms: ↑mountain sickness * * * ˈaltitude sickness 7 [altitude sickness] …   Useful english dictionary

  • altitude sickness — mountain sickness the condition that results from unaccustomed exposure to a high altitude (4500 m or more above sea level). Reduced atmospheric pressure and shortage of oxygen cause deep rapid breathing (hyperventilation), which lowers the… …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • altitude sickness — noun A pathological condition caused by oxygen deficiency at high altitudes; symptoms include shortness of breath, nausea, and nosebleed. Syn: apoxia, mountain sickness …   Wiktionary

  • altitude sickness — In general, any sickness brought on by exposure to reduced partial pressure of oxygen and barometric pressure …   Aviation dictionary

  • altitude sickness — noun illness caused by ascent to high altitude, characterized by hyperventilation, nausea, and exhaustion resulting from shortage of oxygen …   English new terms dictionary

  • altitude sickness — noun Date: 1920 the effects (as nosebleed or nausea) of oxygen deficiency in the blood and tissues developed at high altitudes having reduced atmospheric pressure …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • altitude sickness — UK / US noun [uncountable] an illness caused by the small amount of oxygen in the air when you are very high up, for example on a mountain …   English dictionary

  • altitude sickness — al′titude sick ness n. pat a disorder associated with the low oxygen content of the atmosphere at high altitudes, in acute conditions resulting in prostration, shortness of breath, and cardiac disturbances …   From formal English to slang


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