alligator


alligator
/al"i gay'teuhr/, n.
1. either of two broad-snouted crocodilians of the genus Alligator, of the southeastern U.S. and eastern China.
2. (loosely) any broad-snouted crocodilian, as a caiman.
3. Metall. a machine for bringing the balls of iron from a puddling furnace into compact form so that they can be handled.
4. Jazz. an enthusiastic fan of swing.
v.i.
5. (of paint, varnish, or the like) to crack and acquire the appearance of alligator hide, as from weathering or improper application to a surface.
6. Metalworking. (of a rolled metal slab) to split and curl up and down at one end; fishmouth.
[1560-70; < Sp el lagarto the lizard < VL *ille that + *lacartus, for L lacertus LIZARD]

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Either of two species of long-snouted reptiles constituting the genus Alligator (family Alligatoridae, order Crocodilia).

Alligators differ from crocodiles in snout shape and tooth placement. Living in large bodies of water such as lakes, swamps, and rivers, these lizardlike carnivores use their powerful tail for defense and swimming. The eyes, ears, and nostrils, located on top of the long head, project above the water's surface. Alligators dig burrows in which they shelter from danger and hibernate in cold weather. The once-endangered American alligator of the southeastern U.S. may grow to 19 ft (5.7 m) long but usually ranges from 6 to 12 ft (1.8 to 3.7 m) long. The Chinese alligator of the Chang (Yangtze) River region, which grows to 5 ft (1.5 m), is critically endangered.

Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis)

P. Morris
Woodfin Camp and Associates

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    either of two crocodilians related to the tropical American caimans (family Alligatoridae). Alligators, like other crocodilians, are large animals with powerful tails that are used both in defense and in swimming. Their eyes, ears, and nostrils are placed on top of their long head and project slightly above the water when the reptiles float at the surface, as they often do. Alligators can be differentiated from crocodiles (crocodile) by the form of their jaw and teeth. Alligators possess a broad, U-shaped snout and have an “overbite”—that is, all the teeth of the lower jaw fit within (lingual to) the teeth of the upper jaw. The large fourth tooth on each side of the alligator's lower jaw fits into a socket in the upper jaw. Usually, no lower teeth are visible when the mouth is closed. In contrast, crocodiles have a narrow, V-shaped snout, and the large fourth tooth on each side of the crocodile's lower jaw projects outside the snout when the mouth is closed. Alligators are carnivorous and live along the edges of permanent bodies of water, such as lakes, swamps, and rivers. They commonly dig burrows in which they rest and avoid weather extremes.

      The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), the larger of the two species, is found in the southeastern United States. It is black with yellow banding when young and is generally brownish when adult. The maximum length is about 5.8 metres (19 feet), but it more typically ranges from about 1.8 to 3.7 metres (6 to 12 feet). The American alligator has been hunted for its hide, and its young have been sold in large numbers as pets. It disappeared from many areas where it was once abundant and was later given legal protection from hunters, until it made an excellent comeback and limited hunting seasons were again established. The adult alligator feeds mainly on fishes, small mammals, and birds but may sometimes take prey as large as deer or cattle. Members of both sexes hiss, and the males also give loud roars that carry over considerable distances. During the breeding season, the female builds a mound nest of detritus and vegetation in which she buries about 20 to 70 hard-shelled eggs (egg). She guards the eggs and may at this time be dangerous. Members of this species usually avoid humans.

 The Chinese alligator (A. sinensis) is a much smaller, little-known reptile found in the Yangtze River region of China. It is similar to the larger form but attains a maximum length of about 2.1 metres (7 feet)—although usually to 1.5 metres—and is blackish with faint yellowish markings. It is considered endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN).
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Alligator — Alligators …   Wikipédia en Français

  • alligator — [ aligatɔr ] n. m. • 1663; mot angl. , altér. esp. el lagarto « le lézard » ♦ Reptile (crocodiliens) d Amérique du Nord (Floride surtout) pouvant atteindre plusieurs mètres de long. ⇒aussi caïman, crocodile. ● alligator nom masculin (mot anglais …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Alligator — Al li*ga tor, n. [Sp. el lagarto the lizard (el lagarto de Indias, the cayman or American crocodile), fr. L. lacertus, lacerta, lizard. See {Lizard}.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) A large carnivorous reptile of the Crocodile family, peculiar to America. It has… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • Alligator — Sm (Krokodilart) erw. fach. (16. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus frz. alligator oder ne. alligator, diese zusammengezogen aus span. el lagarto (de los Indios), wörtlich die Echse der Indianer , aus l. lacerta f. Eidechse . Die Lautform schwankt in… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • Alligator — mississippiensis Alligator sinensis Un Aligátor es cualquier miembro de las dos especies del género Alligator que existen, el aligátor chino y el aligátor americano. Tanto el nombre castellano actual como el latino usado en la clasificación… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • alligator — [al′ə gāt΄ər] n. pl. alligators or alligator [Sp el lagarto < el, the + L lacerta, lacertus: see LIZARD] 1. any of a genus (Alligator) of large crocodilian reptiles found in tropical rivers and marshes of the U.S. and China: its snout is… …   English World dictionary

  • Alligator — Alligator, MS U.S. town in Mississippi Population (2000): 220 Housing Units (2000): 81 Land area (2000): 0.983645 sq. miles (2.547629 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.058381 sq. miles (0.151206 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.042026 sq. miles (2.698835… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Alligator, MS — U.S. town in Mississippi Population (2000): 220 Housing Units (2000): 81 Land area (2000): 0.983645 sq. miles (2.547629 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.058381 sq. miles (0.151206 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.042026 sq. miles (2.698835 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • alligator — al li*ga tor, v. i. & t. [Because of the resemblance to the pattern on the skin of an alligator.] to form shallow cracks in a reticulated pattern on the surface, or in a coating on the surface, of an object. [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Alligātor [2] — Alligātor (A. od. Crocodilus a.), das amerikanische Krokodil, mit stumpfer Schnauze, in welcher der 4. Zahn des Unterkiefers in eine Grube des oberen paßt, u. mit halber Schwimmhaut. Lebensart u. Nahrung haben sie mit den Krokodilen gemein; das… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon


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