acrobatics


acrobatics
/ak'reuh bat"iks/, n.
1. (used with a pl. v.) the feats of an acrobat; gymnastics.
2. (used with a sing. v.) the art or practice of acrobatic feats.
3. (used with a pl. v.) something performed with remarkable agility and ease: the verbal acrobatics of a habitual liar.
[1880-85; see ACROBATIC, -ICS]

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Art of jumping, tumbling, and balancing.

The art is of ancient origin; acrobats performed leaps, somersaults, and vaults at Egyptian and Greek events. Acrobatic feats were featured in the commedia dell'arte theatre in Europe and in jingxi ("Peking opera") in China. The later use of apparatuses such as poles, tightropes, and flying trapezes made acrobatics a major attraction in circus performances. Its popularity increased in the 20th century with such performers as the Flying Wallendas (see Karl Wallenda).

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 (Greek: “to walk on tip-toe,” or “to climb up”), the specialized and ancient art of jumping, tumbling, and balancing, often later with the use of such apparatus as poles, one-wheel cycles, balls, barrels, tightropes, trampolines, and flying trapezes.

      In 1859 the invention of the flying trapeze by J. Léotard, as well as Charles Blondin's crossing of Niagara Falls on a tightrope, rekindled public interest in aerial gymnasts and acrobats. Although the trapeze had never been seen before, ropedancing can be traced back to ancient Greece.

      By the turn of the century, acrobatics were important in the circus. About 1900 the Scheffers, Craggs, Hanlon-Voltas, Sandow, Lauck and Fox, Cinquevalli, Caicedo, and the Potters were the most prominent European and U.S. acrobats. Later, the Concellos and Codonas on the flying trapeze, Con Colleano on the tightwire, and the juggler Enrico Rastelli captivated audiences with their skill and daring. Popular mid-20th-century acrobats were the Wallendas, a family of high-wire artists originally from Germany. Traditionally, acrobatics and tumbling were the province of eastern Europeans.

      Acrobatics are performed in fairgrounds, circuses, and theatres. They are also related to movements of modern gymnastics and of certain theatre genres, such as the Peking Opera.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • acrobatics — [ak΄rə bat′iks] pl.n. [also with sing. v.] 1. the art, skill, or tricks of an acrobat 2. any difficult or intricate tricks requiring great skill or agility [mental acrobatics] …   English World dictionary

  • acrobatics — (n.) 1859, from ACROBATIC (Cf. acrobatic); also see ICS (Cf. ics). Earlier was acrobatism (1864). In early 20c. acrobacy (from Fr. acrobacie) sometimes was used …   Etymology dictionary

  • acrobatics — [n] athletic floor exercises balancing, feats, gymnastics, somersaults, stunts, tumbling; concept 363 …   New thesaurus

  • Acrobatics — Infobox Occupation name= Acrobat caption= An arcrobat during a high wire act. official names= acrobat type= performing arts activity sector= sport, busking, circus, show business competencies= skills, manual abilities formation= employment field …   Wikipedia

  • acrobatics — n. 1) to perform acrobatics 2)(fig.) mental acrobatics * * * [ˌækrə bætɪks] (fig.) mental acrobatics to perform acrobatics …   Combinatory dictionary

  • acrobatics — ac|ro|bat|ics [ ,ækrə bætıks ] noun plural 1. ) the skills or movements of an ACROBAT 2. ) the skills that you use when you do something difficult or complicated very well, or when you deal with a lot of things at the same time: the acrobatics of …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • acrobatics — plural noun 1) staggering feats of acrobatics Syn: gymnastics, tumbling; agility; rare funambulism 2) the acrobatics required to negotiate an international contract Syn: mental agility, skill, quick thinking, fancy footwork, alertness,… …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • acrobatics — UK [ˌækrəˈbætɪks] / US noun [plural] 1) the skills or movements of an acrobat 2) the skills that you use when you do something difficult or complicated very well, or when you deal with a lot of things at the same time the acrobatics of balancing… …   English dictionary

  • acrobatics — [[t]æ̱krəbæ̱tɪks[/t]] N PLURAL Acrobatics are acrobatic movements …   English dictionary

  • acrobatics — ac•ro•bat•ics [[t]ˌæk rəˈbæt ɪks[/t]] n. 1) spo (used with a pl. v.) the feats of an acrobat; gymnastics 2) spo (used with a sing. v.) the art or practice of acrobatic feats 3) (used with a pl. v.) something performed with remarkable agility and… …   From formal English to slang


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