High Court of Justice


High Court of Justice
(also the High Court)
the branch of the legal system in England and Wales that deals mainly with serious civil cases (= ones concerned with the private rights of citizens rather than with crimes). It is divided into the Queen’s Bench, the Chancery Division and the Family Division. Cases only go to the High Court if they cannot be dealt with in a lower court (e.g. a county court). Some appeals (= reviews of cases) are dealt with in the Queen’s Bench Division of the High Court:

He’s a High Court judge

➡ note at legal system.

* * *

▪ British law
      in England and Wales, court system centred in London and comprising three divisions of both original and appellate jurisdiction, mostly in civil matters and only occasionally in criminal cases. The divisions are the Chancery Division, presided over by the Chancellor of the High Court (formerly known as the vice-chancellor) and hearing cases involving the administration of estates, mortgages, contracts, land sales, etc.; the Queen's (or King's) Bench Division, presided over by the lord chief justice and hearing cases involving contract or tort, and occasionally criminal matters; and the Family Division, headed by a president and dealing with marriage, adoption, wardship, and other family-related matters.

      All High Court judges may sit in any division, administering both law and equity, although they are now usually assigned to specific work and divisions. There are four sittings: Michaelmas (from October 1 to December 21), Hilary (from January 11 to the Wednesday before Easter), Easter (from the second Tuesday after Easter to Friday before the spring Bank Holiday, the last Monday in May), and Trinity (from the second Tuesday after the spring holiday to July 31).

      The High Court is the second part of the Supreme Court of Judicature, ranking immediately below the Court of Appeal and above the Crown Court.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • High Court of Justice — High Court of Justice: a part of the Supreme Court of Judicature of England and Wales that includes the Chancery, Family, and King s Bench or Queen s Bench divisions – called also High Court; Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster.… …   Law dictionary

  • High Court of Justice — For other uses, see High Court of Justice (disambiguation). High Court of Justice Royal Courts of Justice, The Strand Established 1875 …   Wikipedia

  • High Court of Justice — Der High Court of Justice ihrer Majestät (auch bekannt als The High Court) ist zusammen mit dem Crown Court (Strafgerichtshof) und dem Court of Appeal (Berufungsgericht) Teil des Supreme Court of Judicature (brit. oberster Gerichtshof) in England …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • high court of justice — Usage: usually capitalized H&C&J : the system of superior courts having the highest general criminal and civil jurisdiction in England and Wales and including divisions corresponding to the formerly independent courts now constituting it compare… …   Useful english dictionary

  • High Court of Justice. — See under Supreme Court of Judicature. * * * …   Universalium

  • High Court of Justice —    See Supreme Court …   Historical Dictionary of Israel

  • High Court of Justice — A division of the English supreme court of judicature, established in the reign of Victoria …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • High Court of Justice. — See under Supreme Court of Judicature …   Useful english dictionary

  • high court of justice — highest legal authority in a country …   English contemporary dictionary

  • High Court of Justice for the trial of Charles I — The High Court of Justice is the name given to the court established by the Rump Parliament to try King Charles I of England. This was an ad hoc tribunal created specifically for the purpose of trying the king, although the same name was used… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.