Gaelic football


Gaelic football
n [U]
a sport played by two teams of 15 players each. They play with a round ball that can be kicked, punched or bounced, but not carried. Points are scored either by kicking the ball into a net or by kicking it over the net between two tall posts. It is a popular game in Ireland, where it developed, and in some American cities.

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Irish sport, an offshoot of the violent medieval game mêlée.

In the modern game, sides are limited to 15 players. Players may not throw the ball but may dribble it with hand or foot and may punch or punt it toward their opponents' goal. Goals count as either one or three points, depending on whether the ball passes above (one) or below (three) a crossbar attached to the goalposts. It is played mostly in Ireland and the U.S.

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sport
 Irish version of football (soccer), an offshoot of Britain's medieval mêlée, in which entire parishes would compete in daylong matches covering miles of countryside. A code of rules slightly restricting the ferocity of the sport was adopted in 1884, and the Gaelic Athletic Association was formed the same year to govern competition.

      In the modern game, sides are limited to 15 each. Players may not throw the ball, but they may dribble with hand or foot, punch, or punt the ball toward their opponent's goal. One point is scored for putting the ball between the goalposts and over the crossbar and three points for putting it between the posts and under the bar into a net. A game is divided into two 30-minute periods. Gaelic football is not played much outside Ireland and the United States; the winners of the annual all-Ireland championship usually visit the United States to play its teams.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Gaelic football — (Irish: Peil , Peil Ghaelach , or Caid ), commonly referred to as football , is a form of football played mainly in Ireland. It is, together with hurling, one of the two most popular spectator sports in Ireland today. [] * Bouncing the ball twice …   Wikipedia

  • Gaelic Football — im Croke Park Gaelic Football (irisch: peil, caid oder peil Ghaelach) ist eine Sportart, welche Elemente des Fußball und Rugby aufweist und hauptsächlich in Irland ausgeübt wird, wo es neben Hurling eine der populärsten einheimischen Sportarten… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Gaelic football — n [U] a game played in Ireland between two teams of 15 players, using a round ball that can be kicked or hit with the hands …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Gaelic football — noun uncount a game played in Ireland, in which two teams of 15 players try to kick or hit a large round ball into or over a goal in order to score points …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • gaelic football — noun Usage: usually capitalized G : football played chiefly in Ireland between teams of 15 players who are permitted to dribble, kick, punt, or punch the ball with the fists but may not throw it or run with it * * * Gaelic football noun A form of …   Useful english dictionary

  • Gaelic football — noun A form of football played mainly in Ireland …   Wiktionary

  • Gaelic football — noun a type of football played mainly in Ireland, with a goal resembling that used in rugby but having a net attached, the object being to kick or punch the ball into the net or over the crossbar …   English new terms dictionary

  • Gaelic football — /geɪlɪk ˈfʊtbɔl/ (say gaylik footbawl) noun a code of football originating in Ireland, played with teams of 15 players and a round ball, the goalposts having a crossbar below which is a net; points are scored by kicking or punching the ball… …   Australian English dictionary

  • Gaelic football — noun (U) a game played in Ireland between two teams of 15 players, using a round ball that can be kicked or hit with the hands …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • Gaelic football — UK / US noun [uncountable] a game played in Ireland, in which two teams of 15 players try to kick or hit a large round ball into or over a goal in order to score points …   English dictionary


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