Inner Hebrides


Inner Hebrides

* * *

▪ islands, Scotland, United Kingdom
 islands off the Atlantic (western) coast of Scotland. As their name suggests, the Inner Hebrides lie close to the west coast of Scotland. They stretch 150 miles (240 km) from Skye in the north to Islay in the south and are separated from the Outer Hebrides (Western Isles) by the Little Minch and the Sea of the Hebrides. The largest islands of the Inner Hebrides are Skye, Mull, Jura, and Islay. The Small Islands, Skye, and the surrounding islands (including Soay, Scalpay, Raasay, and Rona) are part of the Highland council area and belong to the historic county of Inverness-shire. The remainder of the Inner Hebrides lie within the council area of Argyll and Bute and the historic county of Argyllshire.

      The small island of Rhum is a Nature Conservancy Research Centre with special interests in botanical and geologic research and the study of the local red deer, wild goats, and local Highland cattle and ponies. The other islands that with Rhum constitute the Small Islands parish—Canna, Eigg, and Muck—have small working communities. Tiree, 50 miles (80 km) west of Oban, the most westerly of the Inner Hebrides, has an economy based on crofting (small-scale tenant farming, largely for subsistence), bulb growing, cattle raising, fishing, tourism, and the quarrying of marble. Islay, the most southerly island of the Inner Hebrides, was the ancient seat of the Macdonalds, Lords of the Isles, until they were displaced by the Campbells in 1616. The island's economy is based on farming, stock raising, cheese making, whisky distilling, and tourism. Other islands of the Inner Hebrides include Coll, Colonsay, Gigha, Iona, Kerrera, Lismore, Luing, Lunga, Oronsay, Seil, Scarba, and the 71-acre (29-hectare) island of Staffa, which is the site of Fingal's Cave.

      By the first centuries AD the islands' inhabitants were speaking Gaelic, and they were Christianized following St. Columba's arrival on Iona in 563. The islands suffered from Norse raids beginning in the 8th century and came under Norwegian dominance from the 9th to the 12th century, when Somerled rebelled against the Norwegians and founded the lordship of the Isles. The Lords of the Isles maintained effective rule over the islands through the late Middle Ages, and the kingdom of Scotland did not establish control over the islands until 1493, when their history largely merges with that of the historic counties of which they became part.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Inner Hebrides — Inner Heb|ri|des the Inner Hebrides a group of islands west of Scotland and east of the ↑Outer Hebrides. The largest islands are Skye, Islay, and Mull, and many tourists go there in the summer …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Inner Hebrides — see HEBRIDES …   English World dictionary

  • Inner Hebrides — The Inner Hebrides (Scottish Gaelic: Na h Eileanan a staigh the inner isles) is an archipelago off the west coast of Scotland, to the south east of the Outer Hebrides. They are part of the Hebrides. In classical sources, they are referred to as… …   Wikipedia

  • Inner Hebrides — Sp Vidiniai Hebridai Ap Inner Hebrides L ss. prie V Škotijos krantų, D. Britanija (Škotija) …   Pasaulio vietovardžiai. Internetinė duomenų bazė

  • Inner Hebrides — noun /ˌaʊtə ˈhebrɪdiːz/ The islands of the Hebrides around the coast of Scotland, separated from the Outer Hebrides by the Little Minch …   Wiktionary

  • Inner Hebrides — noun islands between the Outer Hebrides and the western coast of Scotland • Instance Hypernyms: ↑archipelago • Part Holonyms: ↑Hebrides, ↑Hebridean Islands, ↑Hebridean Isles, ↑Western Islands, ↑Western Isles …   Useful english dictionary

  • Inner Hebrides — geographical name see Hebrides …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Inner Hebrides. — See under Hebrides. * * * …   Universalium

  • Inner Hebrides — In′ner Heb′rides n. pl. geg See under Hebrides …   From formal English to slang

  • Inner Hebrides. — See under Hebrides …   Useful english dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.