daylight saving time


daylight saving time
n.
[often D- S- T-] standard time that is one hour later than the standard time for a given zone based on mean solar time: it is used to give an hour more of daylight at the end of the usual working day: also daylight savings time

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System for uniformly advancing clocks, especially in summer, so as to extend daylight hours during conventional waking time.

In the Northern Hemisphere, clocks are usually set ahead one hour in late March or in April and are set back one hour in late September or in October. In the U.S. and Canada, daylight saving time begins on the first Sunday in April and ends on the last Sunday in October.

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also called  summer time 

      system for uniformly advancing clocks (clock), so as to extend daylight hours during conventional waking time in the summer months. In countries in the Northern Hemisphere, clocks are usually set ahead one hour in late March or in April and are set back one hour in late September or in October.

      The practice was first suggested in a whimsical essay by Benjamin Franklin (Franklin, Benjamin) in 1784. In 1907 an Englishman, William Willett, campaigned for setting the clock ahead by 80 minutes in four moves of 20 minutes each during April and the reverse in September. In 1909 the British House of Commons (Commons, House of) rejected a bill to advance the clock by one hour in the spring and return to Greenwich Mean Time in the autumn.

      Several countries, including Australia, Great Britain, Germany, and the United States, adopted summer Daylight Saving Time during World War I to conserve fuel by reducing the need for artificial light. During World War II clocks were kept continuously advanced by an hour in some countries—e.g., in the United States from Feb. 9, 1942, to Sept. 30, 1945; and England used “double summer time” during part of the year, advancing clocks two hours from Standard Time during the summer and one hour during the winter months.

      In the United States, Daylight Saving Time formerly began on the last Sunday in April and ended on the last Sunday in October. In 1986 the U.S. Congress passed a law that, beginning the following year, moved up the start of Daylight Saving Time to the first Sunday in April but kept its end date the same. In 2007 Daylight Saving Time changed again in the United States, as the start date was moved to the second Sunday in March and the end date to the first Sunday in November. In most of the countries of western Europe, Daylight Saving Time starts on the last Sunday in March and ends on the last Sunday in October.

Jonathan D. Betts
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • daylight saving time — n. [often D S T ] standard time that is one hour later than the standard time for a given zone based on mean solar time: it is used to give an hour more of daylight at the end of the usual working day: also daylight savings time …   English World dictionary

  • daylight saving time — also .daylight savings n [U] the time during the summer when clocks are one hour ahead of standard time →↑British Summer Time …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • daylight saving time — Time each year from Spring through Fall when clocks are set ahead one hour to give people more daylight at end of working day. Daylight saving time is one hour later than Standard Time for the locality …   Black's law dictionary

  • daylight saving time — Time each year from Spring through Fall when clocks are set ahead one hour to give people more daylight at end of working day. Daylight saving time is one hour later than Standard Time for the locality …   Black's law dictionary

  • daylight saving time — daylight saving ,time or ,daylight savings noun uncount AMERICAN the time during the summer when clocks are put forward one hour in order to give people more light in the evening …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • daylight saving time — UK / US or daylight savings UK / US noun [uncountable] American summer time …   English dictionary

  • daylight saving time — UK US noun [U] (ABBREVIATION DST) ► the time used in summer in some countries, usually with clocks set one hour ahead of standard time in order to give more light in the evening → Compare GMT(Cf. ↑GMT), STANDARD TIME( …   Financial and business terms

  • Daylight saving time — This article is about daylight saving time in general. For DST in a specific location, see Daylight saving time by country. Summer time and DST redirect here. For other uses, see Summer time (disambiguation) and DST (disambiguation) …   Wikipedia

  • Daylight\ Saving\ Time — • Ddaylight Saving Time • Daylight Saving • Daylight Time • Fast Time • DST noun A way of keeping time in summer that is one or two hours ahead of standard time. Many places in the United States keep their clocks on daylight saving time in the… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • daylight saving time — also[daylight saving] or[daylight time] or [fast time] {n.} A way of keeping time in summer that is one or two hours ahead of standard time. Abbreviation DST. * /Many places in the United States keep their clocks on daylight saving time in the… …   Dictionary of American idioms


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