waterpower


waterpower
wa·ter·pow·er (wôʹtər-pou'ər, wŏtʹər-) n.
1.
a. The energy produced by running or falling water that is used for driving machinery, especially for generating electricity.
b. A source of such energy, as a waterfall.
2. A water right owned by a mill.

* * *

Power produced by a stream of water as it turns a wheel or similar device.

The waterwheel, probably invented in the 1st century BC, was widely used throughout the Middle Ages and into modern times for grinding grain, operating bellows for furnaces, and other purposes. The more compact water turbine, which passes water through a series of fixed and rotating blades, was introduced in 1827. Water turbines, used originally for direct mechanical drive for irrigation, now are used almost exclusively to generate hydroelectric power.

* * *

      power produced by a stream of water as it turns a wheel or similar device. The waterwheel was probably invented in the 1st century BC, and it was widely used throughout the Middle Ages and into modern times for grinding grain, operating bellows for furnaces, and other purposes. The more compact water turbine, which passes water through a series of fixed and rotating blades, was introduced in 1827 by Benoît Fourneyron (Fourneyron, Benoît), a French experimenter, whose first turbine developed about six horsepower. By 1832 he had perfected a turbine capable of developing 50 horsepower. Various modifications followed Fourneyron's design, notably those of James Thomson (about 1851) and James B. Francis (Francis, James Bicheno) (1855), using radial flow inward. Water turbines, used originally for direct mechanical drive for irrigation, now are used almost exclusively to generate electric power. See also hydroelectric power.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Waterpower — Filmdaten Deutscher Titel: Schpritz Originaltitel: Water Power Produktionsland: USA Erscheinungsjahr: 1977 Länge: ca. 73 Minuten Originalsprache: Englisch …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • waterpower — noun Date: 1817 1. the power of water employed to move machinery 2. a fall of water suitable for being used to move machinery …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • waterpower — noun The capacity to shoot water, as from a fire hose or squirt gun …   Wiktionary

  • waterpower — n. power generated by the force of running or falling water (used to drive machinery), turbine water power …   English contemporary dictionary

  • waterpower — The power existing in water by virtue of the fall of a stream, either in the natural state or the stream or as induced by a dam which impounds the water, applied to the use of man in turning the wheels of machines or in the generation of… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • waterpower — noun the power to do work that is latent in a head of water • Hypernyms: ↑power * * * ˈ ̷ ̷ ̷ ̷ˌ ̷ ̷ noun 1. a. : the power of water employed to move machinery b. : a fall of water suitable for such use …   Useful english dictionary

  • waterpower engineering — noun : a branch of civil engineering that deals with the construction of works to develop waterpower …   Useful english dictionary

  • technology, history of — Introduction       the development over time of systematic techniques for making and doing things. The term technology, a combination of the Greek technē, “art, craft,” with logos, “word, speech,” meant in Greece a discourse on the arts, both… …   Universalium

  • Saint Anthony Falls — Infobox nrhp | name =St. Anthony Falls Historic District nrhp type =hd caption =Aerial view of Saint Anthony Falls with the upper dam; there is also a lower dam. location= Minneapolis, MN area = built =Apron built 1848 architect= Apron by Ard… …   Wikipedia

  • Sugden Reservoir — Infobox lake lake name = Sugden Reservoir image lake = SugdenReservoir.jpg caption lake = image bathymetry = caption bathymetry = coords = coord|42|16|17|N|71|58|06|W|type:waterbody region:US|display=inline,title type = Reservoir inflow = outflow …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.