Pronouns in Fijian


Pronouns in Fijian

Table
Pronouns in Fijian
first person (exclusive) first person (inclusive) second person third person
singular au – o e
dual keirau (e)daru (o)drau (e)rau
paucal keitou ([e]da)tou (o)dou (e)ratou
plural keimami (e)da (o)nī (e)ra
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Universalium. 2010.

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