Intrinsic rate of increase (r) calculated for populations of species that differ greatly in their potential for the rate of population growth


Intrinsic rate of increase (r) calculated for populations of species that differ greatly in their potential for the rate of population growth

Table
Intrinsic rate of increase (r)* calculated for populations of species that differ greatly in their potential for the rate of population growth
species intrinsic rate of increase (r)
elephant seal 0.091
ring-necked pheasant 1.02
field vole 3.18
flour beetle 23
water flea 69
*Values above zero indicate that the population is increasing. The higher the value of r, the faster the intrinsic growth rate of the population. Source: Adapted from Robert E. Ricklefs, The Economy of Nature, 3rd edition, copyright © 1993 by W.H. Freeman & Company, used with permission.
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Universalium. 2010.

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