Fiji, flag of


Fiji, flag of

▪ Flag History

      national flag consisting of a light blue field (background) bearing a Union Jack in the canton and the shield of the national coat of arms (arms, coat of) at the fly end. The flag has a width-to-length ratio of 1 to 2.

      An independent kingdom prior to becoming a British colony in 1874, Fiji briefly used a national flag of white and blue vertical stripes with a red central shield bearing a white dove. That symbol was derived from the flags of Christian missionaries who had visited the area. Under British rule the usual flags were introduced—the Union Jack (United Kingdom, flag of the) for government buildings, the British Red Ensign for private vessels, and the British Blue Ensign for government vessels. The local badge of the colony was put at the centre of the fly end of the Blue Ensign to distinguish it from similar flags used in other colonies. That badge was based on the Fiji coat of arms established in 1908. Its shield contained the red cross of St. George on a white background below another English symbol, a yellow lion on red. However, the lion held a cacao pod, and local symbols (sugarcane, coconuts, bananas, and the Fiji dove) were placed between the arms of the cross.

      In anticipation of independence, Fiji held a competition to develop a national flag. Familiarity with the old design and close links with other Pacific countries (especially Australia (Australia, flag of) and New Zealand (New Zealand, flag of)) led to the selection of a modified version of the colonial flag. The only changes introduced when the nation became independent on October 10, 1970, were the substitution of light blue for dark in the field of the flag and the omission of the crest, motto, and supporters in the coat of arms, allowing the shield to be larger and more easily visible. No further changes were made during the period (1987–97) that Fiji was separated from the Commonwealth.

Whitney Smith
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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