Woodland cultures


Woodland cultures

▪ ancient North American Indian cultures
      prehistoric cultures of eastern North America dating from the 1st millennium BC. A variant of the Woodland tradition was found on the Great Plains. Over most of this area these cultures were replaced by the Mississippian culture (q.v.) in the 1st millennium AD, but in some regions they survived until historic times.

      The Woodland cultures were characterized by the raising of corn (maize), beans, and squash, the fashioning of particular styles of pottery, and the building of burial mounds.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Woodland period — The Woodland period of North American pre Columbian cultures was from roughly 1000 BCE to 1000 CE in the eastern part of North America. The term Woodland Period was introduced in the 1930s as a generic header for prehistoric sites falling between …   Wikipedia

  • Woodland culture — Archaeol. a long pre Columbian tradition characterized by the corded pottery of a hunting and later agricultural people of the eastern U.S. noted for the construction of burial mounds and other structures and dating from c1000 B.C. to A.D. 1700.… …   Universalium

  • Woodland Regional High School — Infobox Secondary school name = Woodland Regional High School established = 2001 type = Public Secondary principal = Arnold Frank faculty = 77 (2006 2007 school year) [ [https://www.edline.net/pages/Woodland Regional High School/Faculty Directory …   Wikipedia

  • List of pre-Columbian cultures — Pyramid of the Sun and Avenue of The Dead, viewed from the top of Pyramid of the Moon, Teotihuacán, Mexico, 100 200 CE This list of pre Columbian cultures includes those civilizations and cultures of the Americas which flourished prior to the… …   Wikipedia

  • Music of Canadian cultures — Music of Canada General topics Portal Genres …   Wikipedia

  • West Virginia Prehistory — The area now known as West Virginia was a favorite hunting ground of numerous Native American peoples before the arrival of European settlers. Many ancient man made earthen mounds from various mound builder cultures survive, especially in the… …   Wikipedia

  • Iowa archaeology — This entry is about the buried remains of human cultures in Iowa. For studies of rocks, fossils, paleontology, and soils, see Geology of Iowa. From Hunters to Farmers: Overview of Iowa PrehistoryWhen the first Native Americans arrived in what is… …   Wikipedia

  • native American — native American, adj. a person born in the United States. [1835 45, Amer.] * * * ▪ indigenous peoples of Canada and United States Introduction also called  American Indian,  Amerindian,  Amerind,  Indian,  Aboriginal American,  or  First Nation… …   Universalium

  • Native American — Indian (def. 1). Usage. See Indian, Eskimo. * * * ▪ indigenous peoples of Canada and United States Introduction also called  American Indian,  Amerindian,  Amerind,  Indian,  Aboriginal A …   Universalium

  • Mound builder (people) — For other uses, see Mound builder (disambiguation). Monks Mound, located at the Cahokia Mounds UNESCO World Heritage Site near Collinsville, Illinois, is the largest Pre Columbian earthwork in America north of Mesoamerica …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.