Warburg, Otto


Warburg, Otto

▪ German biochemist
in full  Otto Heinrich Warburg 
born October 8, 1883, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany
died August 1, 1970, West Berlin, West Germany

      German biochemist awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1931 for his research on cellular respiration.

      After earning doctorates in chemistry at the University of Berlin (1906) and in medicine at Heidelberg (1911), Warburg became a prominent figure in the institutes of Berlin-Dahlem. He first became known for his work on the metabolism of various types of ova at the Marine Biological Station in Naples. His Nobel Prize in 1931 was in recognition of his research into respiratory enzymes. In 1944 he was offered a second Nobel Prize but was prevented from receiving the award by Adolf Hitler's regime, which had issued a decree in 1937 that forbade Germans from accepting Nobel Prizes. From 1931 he was head of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Cell Physiology (later renamed for Max Planck) in Berlin.

      Warburg's research began in the early 1920s, when, investigating the process by which oxygen is consumed in the cells of living organisms, he introduced the use of manometry (the measurement of changes in gas pressure) for studying the rates at which slices of living tissue take up oxygen. His search for the cell constituents that are involved in oxygen consumption led to identification of the role of the cytochromes, a family of enzymes in which the iron-containing heme group binds molecular oxygen, just as it does in the blood pigment hemoglobin.

      By 1932 Warburg had isolated the first of the so-called yellow enzymes, or flavoproteins, which participate in dehydrogenation reactions in cells, and he discovered that these enzymes act in conjunction with a nonprotein component (now called a coenzyme), flavin adenine dinucleotide. In 1935 he discovered that nicotinamide forms part of another coenzyme, now called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, which is also involved in biological dehydrogenations.

      Warburg also investigated photosynthesis and was the first to observe that the growth of malignant cells requires markedly smaller amounts of oxygen than that of normal cells.

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Universalium. 2010.

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