vote of confidence


vote of confidence

      procedure used by members of a legislative body (generally the lower house in a bicameral system) to remove a government (the prime minister and his cabinet) from office. To be successful, the procedure, which does not apply to the removal of heads of state in presidential and semipresidential forms of government, typically requires a majority of legislators to disapprove of the government's actions—i.e., to issue a vote of “no confidence” or a motion of censure. (Compare impeachment.)

      Vote-of-confidence procedures vary from country to country. In the United Kingdom and other countries whose form of government is based on the Westminster model, a vote on a major piece of legislation may be treated as a vote of confidence. Many other countries with parliamentary forms of government allow for formal votes of confidence or censure. In such situations, which may also occur in the United Kingdom, the members of parliament vote only on the fate of the government rather than on a piece of substantive legislation. For example, in March 1979 British Prime Minister James Callaghan (Callaghan, James Callaghan, Baron) was forced to resign after losing a vote of confidence in the House of Commons (Commons, House of) by a one-vote margin (311 to 310).

      The threshold required for a vote of confidence to be successful also varies. In the United Kingdom, for example, a simple majority of those members of the House of Commons present and voting is necessary to force the government's resignation. In some countries (e.g., France and Sweden), however, an absolute majority of the members is required. In France there are also strict limits on the number of votes of censure individual members of the French National Assembly can request in a single year. In Spain and Germany a so-called constructive, or positive, vote of no confidence is required to remove a government, whereby members of the legislature can generally oust a government from office only if they simultaneously agree on a replacement; for example, in 1982 Helmut Kohl (Kohl, Helmut) was selected as Germany's chancellor only after the Bundestag had ousted his predecessor, Helmut Schmidt (Schmidt, Helmut), and agreed to elect Kohl as his replacement.

      In deeply divided parliaments with a large number of parties that strongly disagree with each other, votes of confidence can be a major source of instability. In France during the Third (1875–1940) and Fourth (1946–58) Republics, a cabinet lasted on average less than nine months. Although relatively few governments fell formally because of a vote of censure, that was only because most of them resigned before such a vote could be held. Such cabinet instability was also present in Germany under the Weimar Republic (1919–33). In countries where a single party or a solid coalition has a majority of the seats—which is typically the case in the United Kingdom and Germany since World War II, respectively—the existence of the vote of confidence has the opposite impact. Because the government would be defeated if it lost its majority, the government in power generally insists on strict party discipline on votes of confidence. Put simply, the members of parliament vote strictly along party lines on most occasions; to do otherwise would potentially result in members ousting a government that includes their own party.

Charles Hauss
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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