Ukemochi no Kami


Ukemochi no Kami

▪ Shintō goddess
      (Japanese: “Goddess Who Possesses Food”), in Shintō mythology, the goddess of food. She is also sometimes identified as Wakaukanome (“Young Woman with Food”) and is associated with Toyuke (Toyouke) Ōkami, the god of food, clothing, and housing, who is enshrined in the Outer Shrine of the Grand Shrine of Ise.

      According to the legend recounted in the Nihon shoki (“Chronicles of Japan”), the moon god, Tsukiyomi, was dispatched to earth by his sister, the sun goddess Amaterasu, to visit Ukemochi no Kami. (According to the Kojiki, “Records of Ancient Matters,” it was another brother, the storm god Susanoo, who was sent on the mission.) The food goddess welcomed him by facing the land and disgorging from her mouth boiled rice, turning toward the sea and spewing out all kinds of fishes, and turning toward the land and disgorging game. She presented these foods to him at a banquet, but he was displeased at being offered the goddess's vomit and drew his sword and killed her. When he returned to heaven and informed his sister of what he had done, she became angry and said, “Henceforth I shall not meet you face to face,” which is said to explain why the Sun and the Moon are never seen together.

      Another messenger sent to the food goddess by Amaterasu found various stuffs produced from her dead body. From her head came the ox and the horse; from her forehead, millet; from her eyebrows, silkworms; from her eyes, panic grass (a cereal); from her belly, rice; and from her genitals, wheat and beans. Amaterasu had the food grains sown for humanity's future use and, placing the silkworms in her mouth, reeled thread from them, thereby beginning the art of sericulture—the production of raw silk.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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