Tweed, William Magear


Tweed, William Magear

▪ American politician
also (erroneously) called  William Marcy Tweed , byname  Boss Tweed  
born April 3, 1823, New York, N.Y., U.S.
died April 12, 1878, New York, N.Y.

      American politician who, with his “Tweed ring” cronies, systematically plundered New York City of sums estimated at between $30,000,000 and $200,000,000.

      Tweed was a bookkeeper and a volunteer fireman when elected alderman on his second try in 1851, and the following year he was also elected to a term in Congress. He gradually strengthened his position in Tammany Hall (the executive committee of New York City's Democratic Party organization), and in 1856 he was elected to a new, bipartisan city board of supervisors, after which he held other important positions in the city government. Meanwhile he managed to have his cronies named to other key city and county posts, thus establishing what became the Tweed ring. By 1860 he headed Tammany Hall's general committee and thus controlled the Democratic Party's nominations to all city positions. In that same year he opened a law office through which he received large fees from various corporations for his “legal services.” He became a state senator in 1868 and also became grand sachem (principal leader) of Tammany Hall that same year. Tweed dominated the Democratic Party in both the city and state and had his candidates elected mayor of New York City, governor, and speaker of the state assembly. In 1870 he forced the passage of a new city charter creating a board of audit by means of which he and his associates could control the city treasury. The Tweed ring then proceeded to milk the city through such devices as faked leases, padded bills, false vouchers, unnecessary repairs, and overpriced goods and services bought from suppliers controlled by the ring. Vote fraud at elections was rampant.

      Toppling Tweed became the prime goal of a growing reform movement. Exposed at last by The New York Times, the satiric cartoons of Thomas Nast in Harper's Weekly, and the efforts of a reform lawyer, Samuel J. Tilden, Tweed was tried on charges of forgery and larceny. He was convicted and sentenced to prison (1873) but was released in 1875. Rearrested on a civil charge, he was convicted and imprisoned, but he escaped to Cuba and then to Spain. Again arrested and extradited to the United States, he was confined again to jail in New York City, where he died.

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Universalium. 2010.

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