Tumulus period


Tumulus period

▪ Japanese history
Japanese  Kofun Jidai (“Old Mound period”),  also called  Great Burial Period,  

      early period (c. AD 250–552) of tomb culture in Japan, characterized by large earthen keyhole-shaped burial mounds (kofun) surrounded by moats. The largest of the 71 known tumuli, 1,500 feet (457 m) long and 120 feet (36 m) high, lie in the Nara (Yamato) Basin of Nara prefecture. Their impressive size indicates a highly organized aristocratic society with rulers powerful enough to command huge numbers of workers. Improved armour and iron weapons in the tombs suggest a society of conquest dominated by horse-riding warriors.

      The most noteworthy objects found in and around the tombs are the hollow clay haniwa sculptures. Mounted on clay cylinders embedded in the dirt, they stand in erect position along the approach to the burial place. Also found among the funerary gifts is the magatama, a comma-shaped green jade ornamental jewel that, with the sword and mirror, forms part of the imperial regalia. It is believed that the present Japanese imperial line dates back to the tomb-culture rulers. See also haniwa; magatama.

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Universalium. 2010.

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