Tibetan literature


Tibetan literature

      body of largely religious and occult writings that has developed since the 7th century, when Tibetan became a written language. Until the 13th century most Tibetan literary works were skillfully methodical translations from Sanskrit of Buddhist texts, on which Indian scholars and Tibetan translators worked side by side. There is also an early indigenous literature based on oral tradition that consists mainly of annals, chronicles, legends, liturgies, and compendiums of occult practices.

      The official Tibetan Buddhist canon was closed in the 13th century. By that time, however, there already existed some orthodox Buddhist works of Tibetan origin, and from the 13th century onward there were produced such lengthy and numerous collections of religious histories, biographies, dramas, and treatises and commentaries on Buddhist doctrine that Tibetan literature must be considered one of the most extensive in the world. With the exception of the great epic Rgyal-po Ge-sar dgra-'dul gyi rtogs-pa brjod-pa (“The Great Deeds of King Gesar, Destroyer of Enemies”), there is little secular literature.

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Universalium. 2010.

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