Thai language


Thai language
also called  Siamese,  

      the standard spoken and literary language of Thailand, belonging to the Tai language family of Southeast Asia. It is based largely on the dialect of Bangkok and its environs in the central region of the country but retains certain consonant distinctions (such as l versus r, kl versus k), which are usually merged in the spoken language but preserved in the orthography. Other dialects, differing mostly in their tones and to some degree their consonants, are spoken in other major regions of the country. These are Northeastern (e.g., in Ubon Ratchathani, Khon Kaen), Northern (around Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai), and Southern (Songkhla, Nakhon Si Thammarat). The Northeastern dialects are similar to those of Laos.

      Thai words are predominantly monosyllabic, but many are polysyllabic. The language makes use of tones to distinguish between otherwise identical words. There are five distinct tones in Thai: mid, low, falling, high, and rising. There are 21 consonant sounds and 9 distinguishable vowel qualities. Inflection is completely lacking in Thai, but word-compounding occurs widely—e.g., khamnam ‘preface' (literally, ‘word-leading'), and khâwcaj ‘understand' (literally, ‘enter-heart'). Synonym compounds like hàaŋklaj ‘far distant' and alliterative compounds like ramádrawaŋ ‘cautious' add greatly to the expressiveness of the language. Thai word order is quite rigid. The typical sentence contains subject, verb, and object in that order—e.g., khǎw1 rian2 khanídtasàad3 ‘he1 studies2 mathematics3.' Modifiers follow the words they modify, as in phaasǎa1 thaj2 ‘Thai2 language1' or wîŋ1 rew2 ‘run1 fast2.'

      Thai freely incorporates foreign words. Perhaps the oldest are Chinese, but recent Chinese loanwords also occur. Hundreds of elegant and literary words are taken from Pāli and Sanskrit, and new words are also coined from Sanskrit roots. There are also loanwords from Khmer (the official language of Cambodia), from 16th-century Portuguese, from Austronesian, and in modern times increasingly from English. The Thai alphabet (instituted in the 13th century AD) derives ultimately from the southern type of Indic script. Writing proceeds from left to right, and spaces indicate punctuation but not word division. The alphabet has 42 consonant signs, 4 tone markers, and many vowel markers.

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Universalium. 2010.

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