Taika era reforms


Taika era reforms

▪ Japanese history
Japanese  in full Taika No Kaishin 

      (“Great Reformation of the Taika Era”), series of political innovations that followed the coup d'état of AD 645, led by Prince Nakano Ōe (later the emperor Tenji; q.v.) and Nakatomi Kamatari (later Fujiwara Kamatari; q.v.) against the powerful Soga clan. The reforms extended the direct dominion of the emperor's family over the whole of Japan with an orderly and fair system of government modeled on that of T'ang China. One of the adoptions from China was the naming of eras in an emperor's reign, and the newly enthroned emperor Kōtoku promptly took the era name Taika (“Great Change”) for the first half of his reign.

      Prior to the Taika era, Japan had been a patchwork of clans, and the imperial court had been dominated for 50 years by the Soga family, which worked its will by intrigue, manipulation, and murder. One victim of the arrogant Soga Iruka, the last head of the family, was Prince Yamashiro Ōe, murdered in 643. Thereupon, Iruka styled his own mansion “Imperial Palace” and called his sons princes.

      In 645 Prince Nakano-Ōe and Nakatomi Kamatari killed Iruka in the palace of Nakano's mother, the empress Kōgyoku. She then abdicated in favour of Nakano's uncle, who became the emperor Kōtoku, setting the stage for the reforms to follow.

      Nakano, scarcely 20 years old, had enormous influence in his uncle's regime and became the crown prince; his cohort, Nakatomi Kamatari, became minister of the interior. Nakano Ōe and Kamatari are regarded as the architects of the Taika reforms. Although the orderly government of the Chinese T'ang dynasty had been known for some time through Japanese emissaries and scholars, it was the crown prince's meticulous planning and Kamatari's execution of the reforms that brought Japan for the first time an effective, centralized, imperial government.

      Although some of the reforms traditionally attributed to the Taika era probably occurred later, it is well-established that changes of immense consequence occurred during this period—a considerable number of them in the first year and even the first days of Kōtoku's reign. An Imperial rescript at the beginning of 646 formally initiated the wave of reform. In four articles it abolished private ownership of land and people, proclaiming that they were owned by the public, (i.e., the emperor); that new administrative and military organizations responsible to the emperor should be established both in the capital and the provinces; that a census would be introduced and with it fair distribution of land; and that a new and equitable tax system would be created.

      In March Prince Nakano formally surrendered his estates and serfs to the state; other nobles followed his lead, and in August an edict reinforced the January decree and made such surrender mandatory and universal. The promised census was initiated, reporting not only population statistics but data concerning land use; it prepared the way for a peasant tax system based on population rather than land use, and it also facilitated land redistribution. A Chinese-style Imperial capital was designed and created at Omi, and a large-scale land distribution program was established in the capital area.

      Laws were codified for the first time and then substantially reformed. Government departments emulating those of the T'ang rulers were established and staffed with trained officials, many of whom had been educated in China. Construction of a new nationwide network of roads was started.

      Scholars of the Taika era are struck by the similarity of the scope of its reforms to that of the Meiji Restoration, 1,200 years later, but unlike the Meiji reforms, those of the Taika no kaishin were carefully planned and publicly proclaimed in advance of their execution.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Taika (era) — Tisingh, I. (1834). Annales des empereurs du Japon, p. 48.] Change of era*; 645: The new era name was created to mark the beginning of the reign of the emperor Kōtoku. The previous era ended and the new one commenced in the fourth year after the… …   Wikipedia

  • Taika Reform — The nihongo|Taika Reforms|大化の改新|Taika no Kaishin were a set of doctrines established by Emperor Kōtoku in the year 646. They were written shortly after the death of Prince Shōtoku, and the defeat of the Soga clan, which united Japan. Crown Prince …   Wikipedia

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