Taihang Mountains


Taihang Mountains

▪ mountains, China
Chinese (Pinyin)  Taihang Shan  or  (Wade-Giles romanization)  T'ai-hang Shan,  also called  T'ai-hsing Range 

      mountain range of northern China, stretching some 250 miles (400 km) from north to south and forming the boundary between Shanxi (Shansi) and Hebei provinces and between the Shanxi plateau and the North China Plain. Some Western writers have erroneously called the mountains the T'ai-hsing Range.

      The Taihang Mountains were formed during the mountain-building processes of the Jurassic Period (i.e., about 200 to 145 million years ago). Soils are of the brown forest and cinnamon types. The ranges rise steeply from the North China Plain to an elevation of approximately 3,300 to 4,000 feet (1,000 to 1,200 metres) above sea level; Mount Xiaowutai, in northwestern Hebei province, reaches 9,455 feet (2,882 metres). A spur of the Great Wall (Great Wall of China) extends north-south along the eastern foothills. In the south, in the northwestern part of Henan province, the Taihang Mountains swing to the west to form the southwestern edge of the plateau above the plain of the Huang He (Yellow River).

      The mountains are drained to the east by numerous tributary streams of the Hai River system. Two of these, the Hutuo and the Zhang rivers, break through the main range and drain the interior basins behind the mountains.

      The Taihang Mountains have historically formed an obstacle to movement between Shanxi and Hebei, and the phrase “the road over Taihang” has long been a poetic metaphor for the frustrations of life. The principal routes across the mountains were the so-called “eight passes of the Taihang,” but the most important of them was the pass at Jingxing, now traversed by a railroad from Shijiazhuang (Hebei) to Taiyuan (Shanxi).

      Along the steep eastern face of the mountains are rich and easily accessible coal seams, which are mined in the southern area around Handan (Hebei). The western side of the range, facing inward toward the Shanxi plateau, also has rich coal deposits, which are mined at Yangquan in the north and Changzhi in the south.

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Universalium. 2010.

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