tactical weapons system


tactical weapons system

Introduction

      system integrating tactical weapons with electronic equipment for target acquisition, aiming, or fire control or a combination of such purposes. Tactical weapons are designed for offensive or defensive use at relatively short range with relatively immediate consequences. They include weapons used for antitank assault, antiaircraft defense, battlefield support, aerial combat, or naval combat.

      Unlike strategic weapons systems (strategic weapons system), which are operated by only a handful of nations, tactical weapons systems are ubiquitous: in one version or another they are manufactured by at least 15 countries, and in one form or another they occur in virtually every country that has an army, navy, air force, or guerrilla or terrorist organization of any consequence. They are generally classified according to their point of launching (surface or air) and their target location (also surface or air).

Surface-to-surface systems
      Antitank weapons usually employ a guided missile carrying a shaped-charge warhead that is designed to blast through armour. With wire-guided missiles such as the U.S. TOW or the Franco-German HOT, a wire unreels behind the missile and the operator signals course corrections to a control mechanism inside the missile as it flies. Other missiles are guided by radio, infrared, and laser beams. The U.S. Copperhead is a laser-guided artillery projectile fired from a conventional 155-millimetre howitzer. The gunner focuses a laser on the target momentarily after the projectile is in flight, and a sensor in the weapon is imprinted with the image of the target and operates control flaps to steer the missile to it.

      Battlefield support weapons include such ballistic missiles as the U.S. Lance (Lance missile) and the French Pluton, which have ranges of about 75 miles (120 km). These systems, which can deliver nuclear warheads, incorporate vehicles to launch the missiles and to house command and fire-control computers and other equipment.

      Complementing conventional artillery are truck-mounted multiple-rocket launchers, which can decimate battlefields or truck convoys with dozens of unguided rockets carrying high explosives, antipersonnel or antiarmour bomblets, or even toxic gas.

      Shipborne guided-missile systems are quite varied. Israel's Gabriel system is operated at a computerized control console by one person, who can feed targeting data to the missile before launch and, if desired, during flight. The versatile Otomat system developed by a French-Italian consortium can be used with any radar system and any fire-control system. It is shipped to the purchaser in a case that serves as a launching tube.

      Underwater weapons, intended to disable submarines or surface vessels, are considered surface-to-surface systems. They include various homing or guided torpedoes (torpedo) using sonar tracking systems. Germany makes a wire-guided torpedo. Sweden's antisubmarine weapons system uses a missile that is preprogrammed for its course on the basis of sonar information. One of the most intricate underwater systems is a submarine-launched, rocket-propelled missile such as the U.S. Subroc and the Soviet SS-N-15. These missiles break the ocean surface, streak through the air at supersonic speed for about 30 miles (50 km), and then release a nuclear depth bomb that drops back into the water and sinks to the level of the target before exploding.

Surface-to-air systems
      Land-based antiaircraft systems include guided missiles for farther ranges and automatic guns for close-in fire against aircraft and missiles. Missiles are frequently mounted in clusters on a single tank or truck chassis (as with many of the Soviet SA series), towed on trailers (as with the British Rapier), or operated from an infantryman's shoulder (as with the U.S. Stinger). Missiles are frequently of the solid-propellant type and may be guided by radar or infrared sensors or by a human operator using optical tracking. In the U.S. Patriot system, as many as eight mobile missile-launching stations, each holding four missiles, may be controlled from one mobile control centre, which integrates radar sighting and tracking, identification, missile guidance, and other information.

      The Swiss Flakpanzer antiaircraft tank uses a three-man crew to operate the tank, its radar-controlled firing system, and twin 35-millimetre guns that fire at the rate of 1,100 rounds per minute. Shipboard systems are essentially similar. The Italian Albatros system utilizes the existing fire-control system for a warship's guns to control an added system employing the Aspide homing missile.

Air-to-surface systems
      Most of these systems are enhancements of the role of the attack aircraft and the assault helicopter. What the weapons system brings to the aircraft and its guns or missiles is sophisticated sighting and tracking and fire-control equipment. The weapons involved vary widely in size. The Soviet AS-4 missile is more than 36 feet (11 m) long and is launched by a Tupolev bomber. It is presumed to be inertially guided until it approaches its selected target, when it homes in on the target. The French Belouga system is a cluster of small grenades encased in a bomb that is released over the target area—such as a group of tanks—where it then ejects the grenades. They descend by parachute and, if they hit on or near a tank, they detonate on impact; if they miss, they lie on the ground as mines and detonate when a tank approaches. A European consortium produces a Martel air-to-surface missile that carries a television camera in its nose, transmitting back to the control console in the airplane that released it an image of the target; the controller, by radio signals, then flies the missile to the point where a homing device takes over.

Air-to-air systems
      Air-to-air systems also enhance the role of the fighter aircraft. A variety of guidance systems are employed: the widely used Sparrow system of the United States employs a radar homing system for guidance; the much-used U.S. Sidewinder is guided to the target by the target's heat emission. One French missile is adaptable to either radar or infrared guidance. An Israeli missile system, known as Python 3, is said to have shot down 50 Syrian aircraft in the invasion of Lebanon in 1982. When that system detects an airplane within range, it lights an indicator lamp and sounds a warning in the cockpit of the aircraft carrying the missile. The pilot then may operate the launch button, and the system does the rest. A U.S. sighting development corrects the course of a missile after launch by radio signals generated by computer from the electronically monitored motions of the pilot's eyes as he watches the target aircraft. See also strategic weapons system.

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Universalium. 2010.

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