Sangallo Family


Sangallo Family

▪ Italian family
      outstanding family of Florentine Renaissance architects. Its most prominent members were: Antonio da Sangallo the Elder; his older brother Giuliano da Sangallo; Antonio (Giamberti) da Sangallo the Younger, the nephew of Giuliano and Antonio Sangallo the Elder; and Francesco da Sangallo, the son of Giuliano.

      Giuliano da Sangallo (1445?–1516) was an architect, sculptor, and military engineer whose masterpiece, a church of Greek-cross plan, Sta. Maria delle Carceri in Prato (1485–91), was strongly influenced by Filippo Brunelleschi. It is the purest, most classic expression of that style of 15th-century architecture. Giuliano worked for the powerful Medici family in Florence and built their villa at Poggio a Caiano in 1485. As a military engineer he was effective in the defense of Florence against Naples in 1478. In Rome Giuliano worked on the design of St. Peter's, but he was overshadowed by Bramante. He designed influential facade projects for S. Lorenzo, Florence, in 1515–16.

      Antonio da Sangallo the Elder (1455–1535), a military architect in his younger years, is best known for the major work of his life, the pilgrimage church of the Madonna di San Biago at Montepulciano, a tiny but important cultural centre of Tuscany. An ideal central-plan church (i.e., one symmetrical about a central point) of the High Renaissance, it also is a Greek-cross plan built of travertine and designed with three facades; the west tower was never completed, but the east tower stands, and, with the church placed on a peak overlooking the valley, it is a majestic sight.

      Antonio da Sangallo the Younger (1483–1546) was the most influential architect of his time. He arrived in Rome when he was about 20 and built a town house for Cardinal Alessandro Farnese in 1513, and when the Cardinal became Pope Paul III, he had Antonio the Younger enlarge it into the most imporant palace in Rome, the Palazzo Farnese (Farnese, Palazzo) (1534–46). A fortress-like, 16th-century Florentine palace, this structure was representative of a type of building on which a code of academic rules was based, exercising an immense influence well into the 19th century. The inner court of the palace is entered through an arch entrance, and the carriageway, lined with Roman Doric order antique granite columns, is a superior design. Antonio borrowed from the ancient Roman architectural motifs from the Colosseum and the Theatre Marcellus, but Michelangelo made changes in them.

      Throughout his career, Antonio worked on St. Peter's, first as Bramante's assistant and in 1520 as chief architect. His wooden model of St. Peter's (1539–46), commissioned by Pope Paul III, still stands in the Vatican Museum.

      Francesco da Sangallo, known as Il Margotta (1494–1576), the son of Giuliano, was primarily a sculptor whose style was characterized by minute detailing. He sculpted the tomb of Bishop Marzi-Medici (1546) in the church of SS. Annunziata, Florence, as well as the tomb of Bishop Bonofede (1550) in the Certosa di Val d'Ema, near Florence.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sangallo — is the surname of a Florentine family, several members of which became distinguished in the fine arts, including:* Giuliano da Sangallo (1445 1516) * Antonio da Sangallo the Elder (1455? 1534), younger brother of Giuliano * Francesco da Sangallo… …   Wikipedia

  • Sangallo the Elder, Antonio da — (1455 1534)    Florentine master from a family of prominent architects that included his older brother Giuliano da Sangallo and his nephew Antonio da Sangallo the Younger. His most important commission is the Church of the Madonna di San Biagio… …   Dictionary of Renaissance art

  • Western architecture — Introduction       history of Western architecture from prehistoric Mediterranean cultures to the present.       The history of Western architecture is marked by a series of new solutions to structural problems. During the period from the… …   Universalium

  • Sanmicheli, Michele — ▪ Italian architect born 1484, San Michele, Verona, republic of Venice [Italy] died 1559, Venice       Mannerist architect, especially noted for his original treatment of military fortifications (fortification).       He was a pupil of his father …   Universalium

  • Renaissance architecture — Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, 1502, by Bramante. This small temple marks the place where St Peter was put to death …   Wikipedia

  • Rome — /rohm/, n. 1. Harold (Jacob), born 1908, U.S. lyricist and composer. 2. Italian, Roma. a city in and the capital of Italy, in the central part, on the Tiber: ancient capital of the Roman Empire; site of Vatican City, seat of authority of the… …   Universalium

  • Rome — • The significance of Rome lies primarily in the fact that it is the city of the pope Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Rome     Rome     † …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • History of Rome — The History of the city of Rome spans 2,800 years of the existence of a city that grew from a small Italian village in the 9th century BC into the center of a vast civilization that dominated the Mediterranean region for centuries. Its political… …   Wikipedia

  • Michelangelo Buonarroti — • Italian sculptor, painter, and architect (1475 1564) Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Michelangelo Buonarroti     Michelangelo Buonarroti      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Leonardo da Vinci — Da Vinci redirects here. For other uses, see Da Vinci (disambiguation). Leonardo da Vinci Self portrait …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.