Reagon, Bernice Johnson


Reagon, Bernice Johnson

▪ American musician and historian
née  Bernice Johnson 
born Oct. 4, 1942, Albany, Ga., U.S.

      African American musician and historian whose work ranged from African spirituals to militant civil rights anthems.

      Reagon grew up surrounded by the sacred music of her father's Baptist church. In 1959 she entered Albany State College, where she studied music and first became involved in political activities. In 1961, with members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), she was arrested during a protest march and was suspended from school. The following year she returned to her music studies at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia, but she left the same year to join the SNCC Freedom Singers. The group sang at political meetings and jails and also appeared at the 1963 March on Washington. In 1964 she left the Freedom Singers to bear her daughter, Toshi, who later became an accomplished musician in her own right. Her son, Kwan Tauna, was born in 1965. Reagon's first of a number of solo albums was released in 1966; her second was recorded in 1967. For the next several years she researched traditional African American songs and stories and organized folk festival tours.

      Following this period, Reagon became active in black nationalism. She wrote some of her most militant songs as a member of the Harambee Singers. After completing a degree in non-Western history at Spelman, she moved to Washington, D.C., and became the vocal director of the D.C. Black Repertory Theater. In 1973 she formed the singing group Sweet Honey In The Rock, which consisted variously of four to six women, including Reagon, performing a cappella music, ranging from traditional folk, African chant, field hollers, and Baptist hymns to blues, jazz, and rap music. With their unique sound, the group continued to address political and personal issues, toured widely, and recorded many albums. In 1985 they coordinated the closing cultural festivities for the United Nations Decade for Women Conference in Nairobi, Kenya.

      During her first years with Sweet Honey In The Rock, Reagon earned a doctorate in history at Howard University (1975). In 1974 she began working at the Smithsonian Institution as a cultural historian in the Division of Performing Arts/African Diaspora Project. In 1983 she was promoted to curator at the National Museum of American History, where she had established the Smithsonian's Program in Black American Culture in 1977. Her projects there included a three-record collection called Voices of the Civil Rights Movement: Black American Freedom Songs, 1960–66 and the Wade in the Water series, a long-term project focusing on the history of African American sacred song and worship traditions. In 1989 she received a MacArthur Foundation award. She was appointed distinguished professor of history at American University in 1993 and in 1994 became curator emerita at the Smithsonian. She was involved in a variety of capacities in several award-winning television productions, including the Eyes on the Prize series and the Africans in America series and has compiled many collections of compact discs associated with her numerous research projects.

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Universalium. 2010.

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