radio-frequency heating


radio-frequency heating

Introduction

      process of heating (heat) materials through the application of radio waves of high frequency—i.e., above 70,000 hertz (cycles per second). Two methods of radio-frequency heating have been developed. One of these, induction heating, has proved highly effective for heating metals and other materials that are relatively good electric conductors. The other method, called dielectric heating, is used with materials that are poor conductors of electricity.

Induction heating.
      In this method the material to be heated is placed in a high-frequency electromagnetic field produced by a conductor or coil called an inductor, which is connected to a radio-frequency generator. The electromagnetic field causes electrical currents to be excited in regions of the material that lie within the field of the inductor. These currents heat the object. The precise amount of heat generated is dependent on three factors: (1) the magnitude of the induced currents, (2) the resistance of the material to the flow of the currents, and (3) the length of time the material is exposed to the field.

      Induction heating is used extensively in the metalworking (metallurgy) industry to heat metals for hardening, soldering, brazing, and tempering and annealing. The induction-heating process is also employed in the fusion of metals and the production of high-quality alloys. Since the late 1970s American physicists have applied this type of radio-frequency heating to some types of experimental fusion reactors (fusion reactor). Their objective is to use the technique to heat plasmas (plasma) in fusion reactors known as tokamaks. During one series of experiments, researchers found that radio waves will heat plasma provided that their frequency equals the cyclotron frequency of the plasma ions—i.e., the rate at which the ions travel around the doughnut-shaped magnetic field of a cyclotron (q.v.). Approximately 600 kilowatts of radio-frequency energy were utilized to heat the plasma to roughly 23,000,000 K.

      This method is designed to make use of the heat generated in poor electrical conductors, including insulators (e.g., rubber, plastics, and wood), when such materials are placed in a varying, high-frequency electromagnetic field. The heat results from electrical losses that occur in a material located between two metal plates (electrodes) which form a kind of capacitor connected to a radio-frequency oscillator. Unlike induction heating, in which nonuniform heating may occur, dielectric heating makes it possible to heat an object evenly throughout.

      Dielectric heating has many varied applications, particularly in industry. For example, it is used for drying lumber and gypsum wallboard, for the rapid heating of special glues in furniture making, and for preheating in molding plastics and glasslike materials. In addition, dielectric heating provides the basis for microwave ovens, which are widely used for cooking food.

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Universalium. 2010.

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