Pudovkin, Vsevolod Illarionovich


Pudovkin, Vsevolod Illarionovich

▪ Soviet director
born Feb. 28 [Feb. 16, Old Style], 1893, Penza, Russia
died June 30, 1953, Moscow

      Soviet film director and theorist who is best known for visually interpreting the inner motivations and emotions of his characters.

      Wounded and imprisoned for three years in World War I, Pudovkin returned to the study of chemistry but was attracted to the theatre. After seeing D.W. Griffith's film Intolerance (1916), he applied for admission to the State Institute of Cinematography in Moscow. There he worked with the Russian film theorist and director Lev Kuleshov exploring the psychological possibilities of editing and juxtaposing images into emotional statements.

      Pudovkin's first motion picture was Mekhanika golovnovo mozga (1925; Mechanics of the Brain), an educational film about Pavlov's theories of action and reaction. He then directed Mat (1926; Mother). Based on Maksim Gorky's novel, it exemplifies Pudovkin's use of elaborate crosscutting of images (montage) to represent complex ideas; e.g., a sequence of scenes showing a prison riot is intercut with shots of ice breaking up on a river. Other important films were Konets Sankt-Peterburga (1927; The End of St. Petersburg), Potomok Chingis-Khan (1928; Heir to Genghis Khan, or Storm over Asia), and the sound films, Dezertir (1933; Deserter), Suvorov (1941; General Suvorov), and Admiral Nakhimov (1946–47). His early motion pictures often presented characters of heroic stature caught in the violent evolution of history.

      In two books, Film Technique (1933) and Film Acting (1935), written for Soviet film classes and first published outside the U.S.S.R. in 1929, Pudovkin explained his principles of scenario, directing, acting, and editing. His emphasis on depicting mood influenced the work of filmmakers such as the Hollywood director of suspense thrillers Alfred Hitchcock.

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Universalium. 2010.

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