poetic diction

poetic diction

      grandiose, elevated, and unfamiliar language, supposedly the prerogative of poetry but not of prose.

      The earliest critical reference to poetic diction is Aristotle's remark in the Poetics that it should be clear without being “mean.” But subsequent generations of poets were more scrupulous in avoiding meanness than in cultivating clarity. Depending heavily on expressions used by previous poets, they evolved in time a language sprinkled with such archaic terms as eftsoons, prithee, oft, and ere. It was this “inane phraseology” that William Wordsworth (Wordsworth, William) rebelled against in his preface to the Lyrical Ballads (1800), in which he advocated a poetry written in the “language really used by men.” Subsequent critics, notably Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Coleridge, Samuel Taylor) in Biographia Literaria (1817), felt that Wordsworth overstated the case, that his own best work contradicted his theory, and that some of his work written in “the language really used by men” did not achieve the level of poetry.

      Modern critics take the position that there is no diction peculiar to poetry, though there may be a diction peculiar to an individual poem. Thus, Shakespeare's sonnet “Not marble, nor the gilded monuments,” beginning with such images of stately dignity, continues with words evocative of public pomp and temporal power.

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Universalium. 2010.

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