plant breeding


plant breeding

Introduction

      application of genetic (genetics) principles to produce plants that are more useful to humans. This is accomplished by selecting plants found to be economically or aesthetically desirable, first by controlling the mating of selected individuals, and then by selecting certain individuals among the progeny. Such processes, repeated over many generations, can change the hereditary makeup and value of a plant population far beyond the natural limits of previously existing populations. This article emphasizes the application of genetic principles to the improvement of plants; the biological factors underlying plant breeding are dealt with in the article heredity.

      Plant breeding is an ancient activity, dating to the very beginnings of agriculture. Probably soon after the earliest domestications of cereal grains, humans began to recognize degrees of excellence among the plants in their fields and saved seed from the best for planting new crops. Such tentative selective methods were the forerunners of early plant-breeding procedures.

      The results of early plant-breeding procedures were conspicuous. Most present-day varieties are so modified from their wild progenitors that they are unable to survive in nature. Indeed, in some cases, the cultivated forms are so strikingly different from existing wild relatives that it is difficult even to identify their ancestors. These remarkable transformations were accomplished by early plant breeders in a very short time from an evolutionary point of view, and the rate of change was probably greater than for any other evolutionary event.

      Scientific plant breeding dates back hardly more than 50 years. The role of pollination and fertilization in the process of reproduction was not widely appreciated even 100 years ago, and it was not until the early part of the 20th century that the laws of genetic inheritance were recognized and a beginning was made toward applying them to the improvement of plants. One of the major facts that has emerged during the short history of scientific breeding is that an enormous wealth of genetic variability (variation) exists in the plants of the world and that only a start has been made in tapping its potential.

Goals
      The plant breeder usually has in mind an ideal plant that combines a maximum number of desirable characteristics. These characteristics may include resistance to diseases and insects; tolerance to heat and frost; appropriate size, shape, and time to maturity; and many other general and specific traits that contribute to improved adaptation to the environment, ease in growing and handling, greater yield, and better quality. The breeder of fancy show plants must also consider aesthetic appeal. Thus the breeder can rarely focus attention on any one characteristic but must take into account the manifold traits that make the plant more useful in fulfilling the purpose for which it is grown.

Increase of yield
      One of the aims of virtually every breeding project is to increase yield. This can often be brought about by selecting obvious morphological variants. One example is the selection of dwarf, early maturing varieties of rice. These dwarf varieties are sturdy and give a greater yield of grain. Furthermore, their early maturity frees the land quickly, often allowing an additional planting of rice or other crop the same year.

      Another way of increasing yield is to develop varieties resistant to diseases and insects. In many cases the development of resistant varieties has been the only practical method of pest control. Perhaps the most important feature of resistant varieties is the stabilizing effect they have on production and hence on steady food supplies. Varieties tolerant to drought, heat, or cold provide the same benefit.

Modifications of range and constitution
      Another common goal of plant breeding is to extend the area of production of a crop species. A good example is the modification of grain sorghum since its introduction to the United States about 100 years ago. Of tropical origin, grain sorghum was originally confined to the southern Plains area and the Southwest, but earlier maturing varieties were developed until grain sorghum is now an important crop as far north as North Dakota.

      Development of crop varieties suitable for mechanized agriculture has become a major goal of plant breeding in recent years. Uniformity of plant characters is very important in mechanized agriculture because field operations are much easier when the individuals of a variety are similar in time of germination, growth rate, size of fruit, and so on. Uniformity in maturity is, of course, essential when crops such as tomatoes and peas are harvested mechanically.

      The nutritional (nutrition) quality of plants can be greatly improved by breeding. For example, it is possible to breed varieties of corn (maize) much higher in lysine than previously existing varieties. Breeding high-lysine maize varieties for those areas of the world where maize is the major source of this nutritionally essential amino acid has become a major goal in plant breeding.

      In breeding ornamentals, attention is paid to such factors as longer blooming periods, improved keeping qualities of flowers, general thriftiness, and other features that contribute to usefulness and aesthetic appeal. Novelty itself is often a virtue in ornamentals, and the spectacular, even the bizarre, is often sought.

Evaluation of plants
      The appraisal of the value of plants so that the breeder can decide which individuals should be discarded and which allowed to produce the next generation is a much more difficult task with some traits than with others.

Qualitative characters
      The easiest characters, or traits, to deal with are those involving discontinuous, or qualitative, differences that are governed by one or a few major genes. Many such inherited differences exist, and they frequently have profound effects on plant value and utilization. Examples are starchy versus sugary kernels (characteristic of field and sweet corn, respectively) and determinant versus indeterminant habit of growth in green beans (determinant varieties are adapted to mechanical harvesting). Such differences can be seen easily and evaluated quickly, and the expression of the traits remains the same regardless of the environment in which the plant grows. Traits of this type are termed highly heritable.

Quantitative characters
      In other cases, however, plant traits grade gradually from one extreme to another in a continuous series, and classification into discrete classes is not possible. Such variability is termed quantitative. Many traits of economic importance are of this type; e.g., height, cold and drought tolerance, time to maturity, and, in particular, yield. These traits are governed by many genes, each having a small effect. Although the distinction between the two types of traits is not absolute, it is nevertheless convenient to designate qualitative characters as those involving discrete differences and quantitative characters as those involving a graded series.

      Quantitative characters are much more difficult for the breeder to control, for three main reasons: (1) the sheer numbers of the genes involved make hereditary change slow and difficult to assess; (2) the variations of the traits involved are generally detectable only through measurement and exacting statistical analyses; and (3) most of the variations are due to the environment rather than to genetic endowment; for example, the heritability of certain traits is less than 5 percent, meaning that 5 percent of the observed variation is caused by genes and 95 percent is caused by environmental influences.

      It follows that carefully designed experiments are required to distinguish plants that are superior because they carry desirable genes from those that are superior because they happen to grow in a favourable site.

Methods of plant breeding

Mating systems
      Plant mating systems devolve about the type of pollination, or transferal of pollen from flower to flower (see the article pollination). A flower is self-pollinated (a “selfer”) if pollen is transferred to it from any flower of the same plant and cross-pollinated (an “outcrosser” or “outbreeder”) if the pollen comes from a flower on a different plant. About half of the more important cultivated plants are naturally cross-pollinated, and their reproductive systems include various devices that encourage cross-pollination; e.g., protandry (pollen shed before the ovules are mature, as in the carrot and walnut), dioecy (stamens and pistils borne on different plants, as in the date palm, asparagus, and hops), and genetically determined self-incompatibility (inability of pollen to grow on the stigma of the same plant, as in white clover, cabbage, and many other species).

      Other plant species, including a high proportion of the most important cultivated plants such as wheat, barley, rice, peas, beans, and tomatoes, are predominantly self-pollinating. There are relatively few reproductive mechanisms that promote self-pollination; the most positive of which is failure of the flowers to open (cleistogamy), as in certain violets. In barley, wheat, and lettuce the pollen is shed before or just as the flowers open; and in the tomato pollination follows opening of the flower, but the stamens form a cone around the stigma. In such species there is always a risk of unwanted cross-pollination.

      In controlled breeding procedures it is imperative that pollen from the desired male parent, and no other pollen, reaches the stigma of the female parent. When stamens and pistils occur in the same flower, the anthers must be removed from flowers selected as females before pollen is shed. This is usually done with forceps or scissors. Protection must also be provided from “foreign” pollen. The most common method is to cover the flower with a plastic or paper bag. When the stigma of the female parent becomes receptive, pollen from the desired male parent is transferred to it, often by breaking an anther over the stigma, and the protective bag is replaced. The production of certain hybrids (hybrid) is, therefore, tedious and expensive because it often requires a series of delicate, exacting, and properly timed hand operations. When male and female parts occur in separate flowers, as in corn (maize), controlled breeding is easier.

      A cross-pollinated plant, which has two parents, each of which is likely to differ in many genes, produces a diverse population of plants hybrid (heterozygous) for many traits. A self-pollinated plant, which has only one parent, produces a more uniform population of plants pure breeding (homozygous) for many traits. Thus, in contrast to outbreeders, self-breeders are likely to be highly homozygous and hence true breeding for a specified trait.

Breeding self-pollinated species
      The breeding methods that have proved successful with self-pollinated species are (1) mass selection; (2) pure-line selection; (3) hybridization, with the segregating generations handled by the pedigree method, the bulk method, or by the backcross method; and (4) development of hybrid varieties.

Mass selection
      In mass selection, seeds are collected from (usually a few dozen to a few hundred) desirable appearing individuals in a population, and the next generation is sown from the stock of mixed seed. This procedure, sometimes referred to as phenotypic selection, is based on how each individual looks. Mass selection has been used widely to improve old “land” varieties, varieties that have been passed down from one generation of farmers to the next over long periods.

      An alternative approach that has no doubt been practiced for thousands of years is simply to eliminate undesirable types by destroying them in the field. The results are similar whether superior plants are saved or inferior plants are eliminated: seeds of the better plants become the planting stock for the next season.

      A modern refinement of mass selection is to harvest the best plants separately and to grow and compare their progenies. The poorer progenies are destroyed and the seeds of the remainder are harvested. It should be noted that selection is now based not solely on the appearance of the parent plants but also on the appearance and performance of their progeny. Progeny selection is usually more effective than phenotypic selection when dealing with quantitative characters of low heritability. It should be noted, however, that progeny testing requires an extra generation; hence gain per cycle of selection must be double that of simple phenotypic selection to achieve the same rate of gain per unit time.

      Mass selection, with or without progeny test, is perhaps the simplest and least expensive of plant-breeding procedures. It finds wide use in the breeding of certain forage species, which are not important enough economically to justify more detailed attention.

Pure-line selection
      Pure-line selection generally involves three more or less distinct steps: (1) numerous superior appearing plants are selected from a genetically variable population; (2) progenies of the individual plant selections are grown and evaluated by simple observation, frequently over a period of several years; and (3) when selection can no longer be made on the basis of observation alone, extensive trials are undertaken, involving careful measurements to determine whether the remaining selections are superior in yielding ability and other aspects of performance. Any progeny superior to an existing variety is then released as a new “pure-line” variety. Much of the success of this method during the early 1900s depended on the existence of genetically variable land varieties that were waiting to be exploited. They provided a rich source of superior pure-line varieties, some of which are still represented among commercial varieties. In recent years the pure-line method as outlined above has decreased in importance in the breeding of major cultivated species; however, the method is still widely used with the less important species that have not yet been heavily selected.

      A variation of the pure-line selection method that dates back centuries is the selection of single-chance variants, mutations or “sports” in the original variety. A very large number of varieties that differ from the original strain in characteristics such as colour, lack of thorns or barbs, dwarfness, and disease resistance have originated in this fashion.

      During the 20th century planned hybridization between carefully selected parents has become dominant in the breeding of self-pollinated species. The object of hybridization is to combine desirable genes found in two or more different varieties and to produce pure-breeding progeny superior in many respects to the parental types.

      Genes, however, are always in the company of other genes in a collection called a genotype. The plant breeder's problem is largely one of efficiently managing the enormous numbers of genotypes that occur in the generations following hybridization. As an example of the power of hybridization in creating variability, a cross between hypothetical wheat varieties differing by only 21 genes is capable of producing more than 10,000,000,000 different genotypes in the second generation. At spacings normally used by farmers, more than 50,000,000 acres would be required to grow a population large enough to permit every genotype to occur in its expected frequency. While the great majority of these second generation genotypes are hybrid (heterozygous) for one or more traits, it is statistically possible that 2,097,152 different pure-breeding (homozygous) genotypes can occur, each potentially a new pure-line variety. These numbers illustrate the importance of efficient techniques in managing hybrid populations, for which purpose the pedigree procedure is most widely used.

      Pedigree breeding starts with the crossing of two genotypes, each of which have one or more desirable characters lacked by the other. If the two original parents do not provide all of the desired characters, a third parent can be included by crossing it to one of the hybrid progeny of the first generation (F1). In the pedigree method superior types are selected in successive generations, and a record is maintained of parent–progeny relationships.

      The F2 generation (progeny of the crossing of two F1 individuals) affords the first opportunity for selection in pedigree programs. In this generation the emphasis is on the elimination of individuals carrying undesirable major genes. In the succeeding generations the hybrid condition gives way to pure breeding as a result of natural self-pollination, and families derived from different F2 plants begin to display their unique character. Usually one or two superior plants are selected within each superior family in these generations. By the F5 generation the pure-breeding condition (homozygosity) is extensive, and emphasis shifts almost entirely to selection between families. The pedigree record is useful in making these eliminations. At this stage each selected family is usually harvested in mass to obtain the larger amounts of seed needed to evaluate families for quantitative characters. This evaluation is usually carried out in plots grown under conditions that simulate commercial planting practice as closely as possible. When the number of families has been reduced to manageable proportions by visual selection, usually by the F7 or F8 generation, precise evaluation for performance and quality begins. The final evaluation of promising strains involves (1) observation, usually in a number of years and locations, to detect weaknesses that may not have appeared previously; (2) precise yield testing; and (3) quality testing. Many plant breeders test for five years at five representative locations before releasing a new variety for commercial production.

      The bulk-population method of breeding differs from the pedigree method primarily in the handling of generations following hybridization. The F2 generation is sown at normal commercial planting rates in a large plot. At maturity the crop is harvested in mass, and the seeds are used to establish the next generation in a similar plot. No record of ancestry is kept. During the period of bulk propagation natural selection tends to eliminate plants having poor survival value. Two types of artificial selection also are often applied: (1) destruction of plants that carry undesirable major genes and (2) mass techniques such as harvesting when only part of the seeds are mature to select for early maturing plants or the use of screens to select for increased seed size. Single plant selections are then made and evaluated in the same way as in the pedigree method of breeding. The chief advantage of the bulk population method is that it allows the breeder to handle very large numbers of individuals inexpensively.

      Often an outstanding variety can be improved by transferring to it some specific desirable character that it lacks. This can be accomplished by first crossing a plant of the superior variety to a plant of the donor variety, which carries the trait in question, and then mating the progeny back to a plant having the genotype of the superior parent. This process is called backcrossing (backcross). After five or six backcrosses the progeny will be hybrid for the character being transferred but like the superior parent for all other genes. Selfing the last backcross generation, coupled with selection, will give some progeny pure breeding for the genes being transferred. The advantages of the backcross method are its rapidity, the small number of plants required, and the predictability of the outcome. A serious disadvantage is that the procedure diminishes the occurrence of chance combinations of genes, which sometimes leads to striking improvements in performance.

Hybrid varieties
      The development of hybrid varieties differs from hybridization in that no attempt is made to produce a pure-breeding population; only the F1 hybrid plants are sought. The F1 hybrid of crosses between different genotypes is often much more vigorous than its parents. This hybrid vigour, or heterosis, can be manifested in many ways, including increased rate of growth, greater uniformity, earlier flowering, and increased yield, the last being of greatest importance in agriculture.

      By far the greatest development of hybrid varieties has been in corn (maize), primarily because its male flowers (tassels) and female flowers (incipient ears) are separate and easy to handle, thus proving economical for the production of hybrid seed. The production of hand-produced F1 hybrid seed of other plants, including ornamental flowers, has been economical only because greenhouse growers and home gardeners have been willing to pay high prices for hybrid seed.

      Recently, however, a built-in cellular system of pollination control has made hybrid varieties possible in a wide range of plants, including many that are self-pollinating, such as sorghums. This system, called cytoplasmic male sterility, or cytosterility, prevents normal maturation or function of the male sex organs (stamens) and results in defective pollen or none at all. It obviates the need for removing the stamens either by hand or by machine. Cytosterility depends on the interaction between male sterile genes (R + r) and factors found in the cytoplasm of the female sex cell. The genes are derived from each parent in the normal Mendelian fashion, but the cytoplasm (and its factors) is provided by the egg only; therefore, the inheritance of cytosterility is determined by the female parent. All plants with fertile cytoplasm produce viable pollen, as do plants with sterile cytoplasm but at least one R gene; plants with sterile cytoplasm and two r genes are male sterile (produce defective pollen).

      The production of F1 hybrid seed between two strains is accomplished by interplanting a sterile version of one strain (say A) in an isolated field with a fertile version of another strain (B). Since strain A produces no viable pollen, it will be pollinated by strain B, and all seeds produced on strain A plants must therefore be F1 hybrids between the strains. The F1 hybrid seeds are then planted to produce the commercial crop. Much of the breeder's work in this process is in developing the pure-breeding sterile and fertile strains to begin the hybrid seed production.

Breeding cross-pollinated species
      The most important methods of breeding cross-pollinated species are (1) mass selection; (2) development of hybrid varieties; and (3) development of synthetic varieties. Since cross-pollinated species are naturally hybrid (heterozygous) for many traits and lose vigour as they become purebred (homozygous), a goal of each of these breeding methods is to preserve or restore heterozygosity.

Mass selection
      Mass selection in cross-pollinated species takes the same form as in self-pollinated species; i.e., a large number of superior appearing plants are selected and harvested in bulk and the seed used to produce the next generation. Mass selection has proved to be very effective in improving qualitative characters, and, applied over many generations, it is also capable of improving quantitative characters, including yield, despite the low heritability of such characters. Mass selection has long been a major method of breeding cross-pollinated species, especially in the economically less important species.

Hybrid varieties
      The outstanding example of the exploitation of hybrid vigour through the use of F1 hybrid varieties has been with corn (maize). The production of a hybrid corn variety involves three steps: (1) the selection of superior plants; (2) selfing for several generations to produce a series of inbred lines, which although different from each other are each pure-breeding and highly uniform; and (3) crossing selected inbred lines. During the inbreeding process the vigour of the lines decreases drastically, usually to less than half that of field-pollinated varieties. Vigour is restored, however, when any two unrelated inbred lines are crossed, and in some cases the F1 hybrids between inbred lines are much superior to open-pollinated varieties. An important consequence of the homozygosity of the inbred lines is that the hybrid between any two inbreds will always be the same. Once the inbreds that give the best hybrids have been identified, any desired amount of hybrid seed can be produced.

      Pollination in corn (maize) is by wind, which blows pollen from the tassels to the styles (silks) that protrude from the tops of the ears. Thus controlled cross-pollination on a field scale can be accomplished economically by interplanting two or three rows of the seed parent inbred with one row of the pollinator inbred and detasselling the former before it sheds pollen. In practice most hybrid corn is produced from “double crosses,” in which four inbred lines are first crossed in pairs (A × B and C × D) and then the two F1 hybrids are crossed again (A × B) × (C × D). The double-cross procedure has the advantage that the commercial F1 seed is produced on the highly productive single cross A × B rather than on a poor-yielding inbred, thus reducing seed costs. In recent years cytoplasmic male sterility, described earlier, has been used to eliminate detasselling of the seed parent, thus providing further economies in producing hybrid seed.

      Much of the hybrid vigour exhibited by F1 hybrid varieties is lost in the next generation. Consequently, seed from hybrid varieties is not used for planting stock but the farmer purchases new seed each year from seed companies.

      Perhaps no other development in the biological sciences has had greater impact on increasing the quantity of food supplies available to the world's population than has the development of hybrid corn (maize). Hybrid varieties in other crops, made possible through the use of male sterility, have also been dramatically successful and it seems likely that use of hybrid varieties will continue to expand in the future.

Synthetic varieties
      A synthetic variety is developed by intercrossing a number of genotypes of known superior combining ability—i.e., genotypes that are known to give superior hybrid performance when crossed in all combinations. (By contrast, a variety developed by mass selection is made up of genotypes bulked together without having undergone preliminary testing to determine their performance in hybrid combination.) Synthetic varieties are known for their hybrid vigour and for their ability to produce usable seed for succeeding seasons. Because of these advantages, synthetic varieties have become increasingly favoured in the growing of many species, such as the forage crops, in which expense prohibits the development or use of hybrid varieties.

Distribution and maintenance of new varieties
      The benefits of superior new varieties obviously cannot be realized until sufficient seed (seed and fruit) has been produced to permit commercial production. Although the primary function of the plant breeder is to develop new varieties, he usually also carries out an initial small-scale seed increase. Seed thus produced is called breeders seed. The next stage is the multiplication of breeders seed to produce foundation seed. Production of foundation seed is usually carried out by seed associations or institutes, whose work is regulated by government agencies. The third step is the production of certified seed, the progeny of foundation seed, produced on a large scale by specialized seed growers for general sale to farmers and gardeners. Certified seed must be produced and handled in such a way as to meet the standards set by the certifying agency (usually a seed association). Seed associations are also usually responsible for maintaining the purity of new varieties once they have been released for commercial production.

      The distribution of new varieties developed by commercial plant-breeding companies is often through seed associations, but many reputable companies market their products without following the official certification process. In some countries, particularly in Europe, new varieties can be patented for periods up to 15 years or more, during which time the breeder has an exclusive right to reproduce and sell the variety.

R.W. Allard

Additional Reading
Overviews are presented by R.H.M. Langer and G.D. Hill, Agricultural Plants, 2nd ed. (1991), a description of the major varieties and their products; Jules Janick et al., Plant Science: An Introduction to World Crops, 3rd ed. (1981); and J.W. Purseglove, Tropical Crops: Dicotyledons, 2 vol. (1968, reissued in 1 vol., 1974), and Tropical Crops: Monocotyledons, 2 vol. (1972, reprinted in 1 vol., 1988). Works focusing on plant breeding include John Milton Poehlman, Breeding Field Crops, 3rd ed. (1987); Neal F. Jensen, Plant Breeding Methodology (1988); and Abraham Blum, Plant Breeding for Stress Environments (1988). Ed.

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Universalium. 2010.

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