Oyrat


Oyrat

people
also spelled  Oirat,  

      any of the peoples speaking western dialects of the Mongol language group.

      In the 13th century the western Mongols were enemies of the eastern Mongols of Genghis Khan's empire. During the following centuries the western Mongols maintained a separate existence under a confederation known as the Dörben Oyrat (Four Allies, from which the name Oyrat is derived); at times they were allies, at times enemies, of the eastern Mongols in the Genghis Khan line. Part of the western Mongols remained in their homeland, northern Sinkiang, or Dzungaria, and western Mongolia. Another part of the Oyrat confederation, including all or some of the Torgut, Khoshut, Dorbet (or Derbet), and other groups, moved across southern Siberia to the southern Urals at the beginning of the 17th century. From there they moved to the lower Volga; and for a century and a half, until 1771, they lived as nomads both to the east and to the west of the lower Volga. During the course of the 18th century they were absorbed by the Russian Empire, which was then expanding to the south and east. In 1771 those on the left bank, to the east of the Volga, returned to China. The right-bank Kalmyk (q.v.), comprising the contemporary Torgut, Dorbet, and Buzawa, remained in Russia.

      Considerable numbers of Oyrat still live in the Sinkiang and Tsinghai regions of northwest China, where an estimated 100,000 speak Oyrat dialects; another 50,000 speakers live in the western portions of the Mongolian People's Republic, where they have been dominated by the numerically preponderant Khalkha.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • oyrat — tevaif i etrakdan bir kabile ismi dir …   Çağatay Osmanlı Sözlük

  • Mongolia — /mong goh lee euh, mon /, n. 1. a region in Asia including Inner Mongolia of China and the Mongolian People s Republic. 2. Also, Nei Monggol. See Inner Mongolia. 3. Outer, former name of Mongolian People s Republic. * * * Mongolia Introduction… …   Universalium

  • china — /chuy neuh/, n. 1. a translucent ceramic material, biscuit fired at a high temperature, its glaze fired at a low temperature. 2. any porcelain ware. 3. plates, cups, saucers, etc., collectively. 4. figurines made of porcelain or ceramic material …   Universalium

  • China — /chuy neuh/, n. 1. People s Republic of, a country in E Asia. 1,221,591,778; 3,691,502 sq. mi. (9,560,990 sq. km). Cap.: Beijing. 2. Republic of. Also called Nationalist China. a republic consisting mainly of the island of Taiwan off the SE coast …   Universalium

  • Kalmyk — I. Kal·myk1 (kălʹmĭk, kăl mĭkʹ) also Kal·muck or Kal·muk (kălʹmŭk, kăl mŭkʹ) n. pl. Kalmyk or Kal·myks also Kalmuck or Kal·mucks or Kalmuk or Kal·muks 1. A member of a Buddhist Mongol people now located primarily in Kalmyk. 2. The Mo …   Universalium

  • Tibet — /ti bet /, n. an administrative division of China, N of the Himalayas: prior to 1950 a theocracy under the Dalai Lama; the highest country in the world, average elevation ab. 16,000 ft. (4877 m). 1,250,000; 471,660 sq. mi. (1,221,599 sq. km). Cap …   Universalium

  • Mongolian languages — Family of about eight Altaic languages spoken by five to seven million people in central Eurasia. All Mongolian languages are relatively closely related; those languages whose speakers left the core area in Mongolia the earliest tend to be the… …   Universalium

  • Mongol — /mong geuhl, gohl, mon /, n. 1. a member of a pastoral people now living chiefly in Mongolia. 2. a person having Mongoloid characteristics. 3. any Mongolian language. 4. (often l.c.) Pathol. (no longer in technical use) a person affected with… …   Universalium

  • Altaic languages — Group of more than 50 languages, comprising the Turkic, Mongolian, and Manchu Tungus subfamilies. Altaic languages are spoken across Eurasia by more than 140 million people (the overwhelming majority of whom speak Turkic languages). Most scholars …   Universalium

  • Central Asia, history of — Introduction       history of the area from prehistoric and ancient times to the present.       In its historical application the term Central Asia designates an area that is considerably larger than the heartland of the Asian continent. Were it… …   Universalium


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.