Newburn, Battle of


Newburn, Battle of

▪ English history
      (Aug. 28, 1640), decisive military encounter in the Bishops' War (Bishops' Wars), in which an army of Scottish invaders defeated the English forces of Charles I and captured Newcastle (Newcastle upon Tyne), forcing the king to convene parliament and sacrifice unpopular policies and ministers.

      After the first Bishops' War between Charles I and his Scottish subjects ended in stalemate, in September 1639 the king accepted the advice of Thomas Wentworth, earl of Strafford (Strafford, Thomas Wentworth, 1st earl of, Baron Of Raby), to raise an army of some 30,000 men the following year to take Edinburgh and crush the Covenanter movement. Few of the troops raised saw battle, however. The Scots crossed into England with unexpected speed on Aug. 20, 1640, and within a week reached the River Tyne (Tyne, River). On August 28, they routed the English forces facing them at Newburn near Newcastle. “Never so many ran from so few with less ado,” complained one English officer. Newcastle fell without resistance two days later. In London, the government panicked, and some officials planned to prepare Portsmouth, on the English Channel coast, as a last-ditch stronghold.

      Although the Scots remained in the north, in November the king reluctantly agreed to convene parliament (the Long Parliament) in order to raise the money needed to pay his own army and to buy off the Scots. This allowed his domestic opponents to make redress of their grievances a precondition for voting funds, and they worked closely with the Scottish peace commissioners to get their way—particularly in eliminating Strafford. On May 10, 1641, Charles signed Strafford's death warrant; the next day Parliament agreed to a draft treaty with the Scots. Strafford's execution took place on the 12th, and the following day Parliament voted the funds needed to demobilize all the troops in the north. The Scots marched out of Newcastle in August 1641. One year later, the English Civil Wars began.

N. Geoffrey Parker
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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