New Novel


New Novel

French  nouveau roman,  also called (more broadly)  antinovel 

      avant-garde novel of the mid-20th century that marked a radical departure from the conventions of the traditional novel in that it ignores such elements as plot, dialogue, linear narrative, and human interest. Starting from the premise that the potential of the traditional novel had been exhausted, the writers of New Novels sought new avenues of fictional exploration. In their efforts to overcome literary habits and to challenge the expectations of their readers, they deliberately frustrated conventional literary expectations, avoiding any expression of the author's personality, preferences, or values. They rejected the elements of entertainment, dramatic progress, and dialogue that serve to delineate character or develop plot.

      The term antinovel (or, more precisely, anti-roman) was first used by Jean-Paul Sartre in an introduction to Nathalie Sarraute (Sarraute, Nathalie)'s Portrait d'un inconnu (1948; Portrait of a Man Unknown). This term has often been applied to the fiction of such writers as Sarraute, Claude Simon (Simon, Claude), Alain Robbe-Grillet (Robbe-Grillet, Alain), Marguerite Duras (Duras, Marguerite), and Michel Butor (Butor, Michel) and is therefore usually associated with the French nouveau roman of the 1950s and '60s. In place of reassuring conventions, these French authors offered the reader more demanding fiction, presenting compressed, repetitive, or only partially explained events whose meaning is rarely clear or definitive. In Robbe-Grillet's La Jalousie (1957; Jealousy), for example, the narrator's suspicions of his wife's infidelity are never confirmed or denied. The story is not laid out chronologically, but rather the reader is subject to the narrator's obsessive review of observed details and events.

      Though the word antinovel is of relatively recent coinage, the nonlinear approach to novel writing is at least as old as the works of Laurence Sterne (Sterne, Laurence). Works contemporary with the nouveau roman but written in other languages—such as the German novelist Uwe Johnson's Mutmassungen über Jakob (1959; Speculations About Jakob) and the British author Rayner Heppenstall's Connecting Door (1962)—share many of the characteristics of the New Novel, such as vaguely identified characters, casual arrangement of events, and ambiguity of meaning.

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Universalium. 2010.

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