National Party


National Party

also called (1975–82)  National Country Party , or (1914–75)  Country Party 

      an Australian political party that for most of its history has held office as a result of its customary alliance with the Liberal Party of Australia (q.v.). It often acted as a margin in the balance of power, but its own power declined over the years. In 1934 it could command 16 percent of the vote in federal elections. By 1975 its federal vote had fallen to 8 percent. In October 1982 it took the name National Party.

      The agricultural interest in Australia first began to organize politically in the 1890s to eliminate import duties on farm machinery, to end the Labor land tax on big estates, and to counter the growing strength of organized labour and the Labor Party. State farmers' associations with these objectives developed during World War I. The first local Country Party to win seats in an Australian parliament was that in Western Australia in 1914. In 1918 a federal organization was created and in 1919 named the Country Party. In 1923, Country Party leader Earle Page negotiated a coalition agreement with the Nationalist (formerly Liberal) Party leader, Stanley Melbourne Bruce, and led 5 Country Party members into a cabinet of 11. The coalition government, which continued until 1929, focused largely on developing the national economy.

      Never again did Page or the party exercise so much influence as in the 1920s. However, it continued to supply votes and ministers to the governments of the Nationalist Party and its successors, the United Australia Party (1931–44) and the Liberal Party (from 1944), when those parties were in power.

in full  National Party of South Africa,  Afrikaans  Nasionale Party van Suid-Afrika  (1914–39, 1951–98), also called  New National Party  – (1998–2005),  People's Party  or  Re-united National Party  (1939–51) 

      South African political party, founded in 1914, which ruled the country from 1948 to 1994. Its following included most of the Dutch-descended Afrikaners and many English-speaking whites. The National Party was long dedicated to policies of apartheid and white supremacy, but by the early 1990s it had moved toward sharing power with South Africa's black majority.

      J.B.M. Hertzog (Hertzog, J B M) founded the National Party in 1914 in order to rally Afrikaners against what he considered the Anglicizing policies of the government of Louis Botha (Botha, Louis) and Jan Christian Smuts (Smuts, Jan). In 1924, after mild attempts to relax the colour bar, the Smuts government was defeated by a Nationalist-Labour coalition led by Hertzog, who in two terms sought to further emancipate South Africa from British imperial control and to provide greater “protection” for the whites from the black Africans and for the Afrikaners from the British. From 1933 to 1939 Hertzog and Smuts joined a coalition government and fused their respective followings into the United Party. Some Nationalists, led by Daniel F. Malan (Malan, Daniel F), however, held out and kept the National Party alive and, in 1939, reaccepted Hertzog as their leader in a reorganized opposition party known as the Re-united National Party, or People's Party (Herenigde Nasionale Party, or Volksparty). The new party was weakened by wartime factionalism; and Hertzog and others with Nazi sympathies eventually walked out and formed the Afrikaner Party (1941).

      The Re-united National Party returned victoriously in the 1948 elections and subsequently enacted a mass of racial legislation that was designed to preserve white supremacy in South Africa; the National Party named its policy “apartheid.” The party went on to consolidate its power, absorbing the Afrikaner Party in 1951. It renamed itself the National Party of South Africa (1951) and gradually augmented its control of the House of Assembly—from 73 seats in 1948 to 134 seats (81 percent) in 1977. The party was led successively by Daniel F. Malan (1948–54), Johannes Gerhardus Strijdom (Strijdom, Johannes Gerhardus) (1954–58), Hendrik Frensch Verwoerd (Verwoerd, Hendrik Frensch) (1958–66), John Vorster (Vorster, John) (1966–78), P.W. Botha (Botha, P. W.) (1978–89), F.W. de Klerk (de Klerk, F.W.) (1989–97), and Marthinus van Schalkwyk (1997–2005). The National Party also broke South Africa away from the Commonwealth, making it a republic in 1961. From the premiership of Vorster on, the National Party attempted what it termed an “enlightened” (verligte) policy on the race question; but this meant hardly more than speeding up the formation of black “homelands” and alleviating—selectively—some of the apartheid policies found inconvenient to general economic and cultural development.

      In 1982 much of the party's right wing broke off in opposition to the granting of limited political rights to Coloureds (those of mixed descent) and Asians (primarily Indians) and formed the Conservative Party. Under de Klerk's leadership from 1989, the National Party began taking steps away from apartheid and toward a constitutional arrangement that would allow political representation to the country's black African majority. To this end, many repressive laws were repealed and black antiapartheid political organizations were legalized. In 1992 a referendum called by de Klerk won a strong endorsement of the party's reform policy and led to negotiations with the African National Congress (ANC) and other minority parties toward a new constitution. The National Party was defeated in South Africa's first multiracial elections, held in April 1994, but remained a significant presence in Parliament, winning 82 seats. The party subsequently joined in the government of national unity formed by the ANC; it was awarded six cabinet posts, and de Klerk, along with Thabo Mbeki (Mbeki, Thabo) of the ANC, became deputy president of South Africa.

      In June 1996 the National Party left the national unity government—its first time out of government since 1948. The party sought to recast its image by changing its name to the New National Party (NNP) in December 1998. In 1999, however, its support fell, and it won only 28 seats in Parliament. The following year the party formed the Democratic Alliance with the Democratic Party and the Federal Alliance, though the NNP withdrew in 2001. Later that year the party formed a pact with the ANC, its historic foe. After several years of declining popularity, in 2005 the party's federal council voted to disband the party.

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Universalium. 2010.

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