Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich


Molotov, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich

▪ foreign minister of Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
original name  Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich Skryabin  
born Feb. 25 [March 9, New Style], 1890, Kukarka [now Sovetsk], Russia
died Nov. 8, 1986, Moscow, Russia, U.S.S.R.
 statesman and diplomat who was foreign minister and the major spokesman for the Soviet Union at Allied conferences during and immediately after World War II.

      A member and organizer of the Bolshevik party from 1906, Molotov was twice arrested (1909, 1915) for his revolutionary activities. After the Bolsheviks seized power (1917), Molotov worked in several provincial party organizations. In 1921 he became a member and a secretary of the Central Committee as well as a candidate member of the Politburo. He staunchly supported Joseph Stalin (Stalin, Joseph) after the death of Vladimir Ilich Lenin (1924), and in December 1926 he was promoted to full membership in the Politburo. He then assumed control of the Moscow Party Committee and purged the Moscow organization of its anti-Stalin membership (1928–30). In 1930 he was made chairman of the Council of People's Commissars (i.e., prime minister of the Soviet Union), a post he held until 1941.

      Shortly before the outbreak of World War II, Molotov was picked by Stalin to replace Maksim Litvinov as the Soviet commissar of foreign affairs (May 1939). In this capacity he negotiated the German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact (Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact; August 1939) with Nazi Germany. In May 1941, when Stalin himself took over as chairman of the Council of Ministers (formerly Council of People's Commissars), Molotov remained its first deputy chairman. After Germany invaded the Soviet Union (June 1941), he also served on the State Defense Committee (the special war cabinet). Molotov arranged the Soviet alliances with Great Britain and the United States and attended the Allies' conferences at Tehrān (1943), Yalta (1945), and Potsdam (1945) as well as the San Francisco Conference (1945), which created the United Nations. (It was during World War II that Molotov ordered the production of the bottles of inflammable liquid that became known as Molotov cocktails.) In his wartime dealings with the Allies and afterward, he earned a reputation for uncompromising hostility to the West.

      In March 1949 Molotov gave up the post of foreign minister, but, after Stalin died (March 1953), he resumed it, holding it until his political disagreements with Nikita Khrushchev (Khrushchev, Nikita Sergeyevich) resulted in his dismissal (June 1956). He was made minister of state control in November, but, when he joined the “antiparty group” that unsuccessfully tried to depose Khrushchev in June 1957, he lost all his high party and state offices. He subsequently served as ambassador to Mongolia and as the Soviet delegate to the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna (1960–61). In 1962, after engaging in more criticisms of Khrushchev, he was expelled from the Communist Party. He lived thereafter in undisturbed retirement in Moscow.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Molotov, Vyacheslav (Mikhaylovich) — orig. Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich Skryabin born March 9, 1890, Kukarka, Russia died Nov. 8, 1986, Moscow, Russia, U.S.S.R. Soviet political leader. A member of the Bolsheviks from 1906, he worked in provincial Communist Party organizations from 1917 …   Universalium

  • Scrjabin, Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich — vero nome di Molotov …   Sinonimi e Contrari. Terza edizione

  • Mikhaylovich — (as used in expressions) Aleksey Mikhaylovich Bekhterev Vladimir Mikhaylovich Budenny Semyon Mikhaylovich Chernov Viktor Mikhaylovich Dostoyevsky Fyodor Mikhaylovich Eisenstein Sergey Mikhaylovich Mikhail Mikhaylovich Fokine Komarov Vladimir… …   Universalium

  • Vyacheslav — (as used in expressions) Ivanov Vyacheslav Ivanovich Plehve Vyacheslav Konstantinovich Molotov Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich Skryabin * * * …   Universalium

  • Molotov — I. biographical name Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich 1890 1986 originally surname Skryabin Soviet statesman II. geographical name see Perm …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • international relations — a branch of political science dealing with the relations between nations. [1970 75] * * * Study of the relations of states with each other and with international organizations and certain subnational entities (e.g., bureaucracies and political… …   Universalium

  • Union of Soviet Socialist Republics — a former federal union of 15 constituent republics, in E Europe and W and N Asia, comprising the larger part of the former Russian Empire: dissolved in December 1991. 8,650,069 sq. mi. (22,402,200 sq. km). Cap.: Moscow. Also called Russia, Soviet …   Universalium

  • German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact — or Nazi Soviet Nonaggression Pact (Aug. 23, 1939) Agreement stipulating mutual nonaggression between the Soviet Union and Germany. The Soviet Union, whose proposed collective security agreement with Britain and France was rebuffed, approached… …   Universalium

  • Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.… …   Universalium

  • Khrushchev, Nikita Sergeyevich — ▪ premier of Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Introduction born April 17 [April 5, Old Style], 1894, Kalinovka, Russia died September 11, 1971, Moscow, Russia, Soviet Union  first secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (1953–64)… …   Universalium


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.