Minh Mang


Minh Mang

▪ emperor of Vietnam
also spelled  Minh Menh , original name  Nguyen Phuoc Chi Dam 
born May 24, 1792, Saigon [now Ho Chi Minh City], Vietnam
died Jan. 11/21, 1841, Hue

      emperor (1820–41) of central Vietnam who was known for his anti-Western policies, especially his persecution of Christian missionaries.

      Prince Chi Dam was the fourth son of Emperor Gia Long (reigned 1802–20) and his favourite concubine and thus was not in line for the throne. He was chosen by Gia Long as his successor, however, because of his outspoken criticism of Europeans. Chi Dam took the reign name Minh Mang.

      As a strict Confucian, Minh Mang believed that Christian doctrine undermined the basic principles of Vietnamese religious and political life, especially the worship of and obedience to the emperor as a divine emissary. In the early years of his reign he induced French missionaries to move from their posts to the capital at Hue, claiming that he needed interpreters. To persuade them to relinquish their proselytizing efforts, he conferred mandarin degrees upon them. As new priests arrived and refused to give up their missions, however, Minh Mang barred the entry of additional Christian missionaries (1825) and subsequently forbade the preaching of Christian doctrine; he also had the missionaries imprisoned. In response to pleas for moderation, Minh Mang consented to allow the priests to board a ship bound for Europe, but instead the freed missionaries returned secretly to their posts.

      Because of his tenuous claim to the throne, Minh Mang felt the threat of pretenders who were soliciting help from the French for his overthrow. He also doubted the loyalty of his own people; though not indifferent to the plight of the peasants, he produced little land or social reform. Rebellion broke out in Saigon in 1833, and, when its leaders requested and received help from the Christian mission, Minh Mang was enraged and began active persecution of the Christians. He ordered the execution of the Reverend François Gagelin (Oct. 17, 1833); seven European missionaries were killed in the years to come, as were great numbers of native converts. Minh Mang's actions served as an excuse for France to invade Vietnam in 1858 so as to ensure the safety of French citizens.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Minh Mang — Minh Mạng 明命 Emperor of Vietnam Depiction of Minh Mạng from John Crawfurd s journal Reign …   Wikipedia

  • Minh Mang — Minh Mạng (明命) Prinzenname Nguyễn Phúc Đảm (阮福膽) Persönlicher Name Nguyễn Phúc Kiểu ( …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Minh Mạng — (明命) Prinzenname Nguyễn Phúc Đảm (阮福膽) Persönlicher Name …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Minh Mang — Minh Mạng Minh Mạng Empereur vietnamien …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Minh Mạng — Titre Empereur vietnamien 1820 – 1841 Prédécesseur Gia Long …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Mang Thit District — Mang Thít   District   Country  Vietnam Region Mekong Delta …   Wikipedia

  • Minh Tuyet — Minh Tuyết File:TNCD480 inside.jpg Background information Birth name Trần Thị Minh Tuyết Born Saigon, South Vietnam Genres Pop …   Wikipedia

  • Minh Tuyết — (Tran Thi Minh Tuyết: Saigon, 5 de octubre de 1976) es una cantante pop vietnamita estadounidense. Actualmente trabaja en el espectáculo de variedades París de noche , de la compañía Thúy Nga Paris. Sus hermanas, también cantantes, son Cam Ly y… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Minh Tuyet — (vietn. Minh Tuyết; * 15. Oktober 1976 in Saigon als Tran Thi Minh Tuyet) ist eine vietnamesisch amerikanische Pop Sängerin. Zusammen mit ihren Schwestern Cam Ly und Ha Phuong, die beide auch Sängerinnen sind, tritt sie in der vietnamesischen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Minh Tuyết — (vietn. Minh Tuyết; * 15. Oktober 1976 in Saigon als Trần Thị Minh Tuyết) ist eine vietnamesisch amerikanische Pop Sängerin. Zusammen mit ihren Schwestern Cam Ly und Ha Phuong, die beide auch Sängerinnen sind, tritt sie in der vietnamesischen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.