Macro-Algonquian languages


Macro-Algonquian languages
also spelled  Macro-Algonkian 

      major group (phylum or superstock) of North American Indian languages; it is composed of nine families and a total of 24 languages or dialect groups. The language families included in Macro-Algonquian are Algonquian, with 13 languages; Yurok, with 1 language; Wiyot, with 1 language; Muskogean, with 4 languages; and Natchez, Atakapa, Chitimacha, Tunica, and Tonkawa, with 1 language apiece of the same name. The Macro-Algonquian languages were spoken prior to European settlement in eastern North America from Labrador and eastern Quebec down the Atlantic seacoast to North Carolina; around the Great Lakes west into Saskatchewan, Alberta, Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado; in the southeastern United States from eastern Texas to Florida and Georgia and north into Tennessee; and in an isolated area in northern California (Wiyot and Yurok).

      Major languages in the phylum are the Cree and Innu (Montagnais and Naskapi) dialects of eastern Canada; the Ojibwa, Algonquin, Ottawa, and Salteaux dialects of southern Ontario; the Mi'kmaq (Micmac) language of eastern Canada; and the Blackfoot language of Montana and Alberta. These are all Algonquian languages. The Choctaw–Chickasaw dialects are spoken in Mississippi; and the Muskogee, or Creek, and Seminole dialects are spoken in Oklahoma, Alabama, and Florida. These languages belong to the Muskogean family.

      Like many American Indian languages, the Macro-Algonquian languages are polysynthetic in their structure; that is, they form words out of many so-called bound elements (which may not be used except in combination with other such elements), which serve as nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs. Thus, a single Algonquian word may carry the meaning of an entire sentence in English. These languages make great use of suffixes and, to some extent, prefixes. They also use inflection as a grammatical device and have some development of case; in addition, they make use of word-stem modification such as reduplication (doubling the stem word or syllables thereof1PT).

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Universalium. 2010.

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