Macedonian literature


Macedonian literature

      literature written in the South Slavic Macedonian language.

      The earliest Macedonian literature, in the medieval period, was religious and Orthodox Christian. Under Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) Turkish rule (c. 1400 to 1913), Macedonian literature suffered an eclipse, but in the 19th century there appeared original lyric poetry written by Konstantin Miladinov, who, with his brother Dimitrije, compiled a notable collection of legends and folk songs that contributed to the development of a nascent Macedonian literature.

      When Turkish rule was supplanted by Serbian rule in 1913, the Serbs officially denied Macedonian distinctiveness, considering the Macedonian language merely a dialect of Serbo-Croatian. The Macedonian language was not officially recognized until the establishment of Macedonia as a constituent republic of communist Yugoslavia in 1946. Despite these drawbacks, some progress was made toward the foundation of a national language and literature, in particular by Kosta P. Misirkov in his Za Makedonskite raboti (1903; “In Favour of Macedonian Literary Works”) and in the literary periodical Vardar (established 1905). These efforts were continued after World War I by Kosta Racin, who wrote mainly poetry in Macedonian and propagated its use through the literary journals of the 1930s. Racin's poems in Beli mugri (1939; White Dawns), which include many elements of oral folk poetry, were prohibited by the government of pre-World War II Yugoslavia because of their realistic and powerful portrayal of the exploited and impoverished Macedonian people. Some writers, such as Kole Nedelkovski, worked and published abroad because of political pressure.

      After World War II, under the new republic of Macedonia, the scholar Blaže Koneski and others were charged with the task of standardizing Macedonian as the official literary language. With this new freedom to write and publish in its own language, Macedonia produced many literary figures in the postwar period. Poetry was represented in the work of Aco Šopov, Slavko Janevski, Blaže Koneski, and Gane Todorovski. Janevski was also a distinguished prose writer and the author of the first Macedonian novel, Selo zad sedumte jaseni (1952; “The Village Beyond the Seven Ash Trees”). His most ambitious work was a cycle of six novels that deals with Macedonian history and includes Tvrdoglavi (1965; “The Stubborn Ones”), a novel articulating the Macedonian people's myths and legends of remembering and interpreting their history. Prewar playwrights, such as Vasil Iljoski, continued to write, and the theatre was invigorated by new dramatists, such as Kole Čašule, Tome Arsovski, and Goran Stefanovski. Čašule also wrote several novels. A main theme of his work is the defeat of idealists and idealism. His play Crnila (1960; “Black Things”) deals with the early 20th-century murder of a Macedonian national leader by other Macedonians and with the characters of both executioners and victim.

      Among the best-known writers of prose is Živko Čingo, whose collections of stories Paskvelija (1962) and Nova Paskvelija (1965; “New Paskvelija”) are about an imaginary land where clashes and interactions between old traditions and revolutionary consciousness are enacted. His novel Golemata voda (1971; “The Great Water”), set in an orphanage, shows the grandness and sadness of childhood. Other notable writers include Vlada Urošević (Sonuvačot i prazninata [1979; “The Dreamer and the Emptiness”]) and Jovan Pavlovski (Sok od prostata [1991; “Prostatic Gland Juice”]).

Gordana P. Crnkovic

Additional Reading
Miodrag Drugovats (Drugovac), Contemporary Macedonian Writers (1976); and Graham Wightman Reid, The Macedonian Novel (1971); focus exclusively on Macedonian writers. Thomas Eekman, Thirty Years of Yugoslav Literature, 1945–1975 (1978); and Vasa D. Mihailovich, A Comprehensive Bibliography of Yugoslav Literature in English (1984, 1988, and 1992); deal with Macedonian literature within a broader context. Useful anthologies in English translation include Richard Gaughran and Zoran Ancevski (eds.), Change of the System: Stories of Contemporary Macedonia (2000); Venko Andonovski (ed.), The Song Beyond Songs: Anthology of Contemporary Macedonian Poetry (1997; originally published in Macedonian); Ewald Osers (ed. and trans.), Contemporary Macedonian Poetry (1991), introduced by George MacBeth; Milne Holton and Graham Wightman Reid (eds.), Reading the Ashes: An Anthology of the Poetry of Modern Macedonia (1977); Milne Holton (ed.), The Big Horse and Other Stories of Modern Macedonia (1974); Branko Mikasinovich, Dragan Milivojevic, and Vasa D. Mihailovich (eds.), Introduction to Yugoslav Literature: An Anthology of Fiction and Poetry (1973).

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Universalium. 2010.

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