Karatsu ware


Karatsu ware

▪ Japanese art
      Japanese ceramic ware of Korean origin produced in Kyushu. The actual date of production is thought to be sometime during the first half of the 16th century, in the late Muromachi period.

      The generic term Karatsu is applied to many different types of ceramics. The clays were sandy and high in iron content. Ordinarily, all vessels were covered with ash, feldspar, or temmoku glazes. They are of two types: undecorated, with only a plain ash slip glaze, and pictorial, or decorated, painted with an iron underglaze. Since they are built up by the coiling method and manually pounded into shape, they are simple and unsophisticated but have great strength and feeling for nature.

      The development of Karatsu was fostered by the adoption of entirely new techniques taken to Japan from Korea, and the earliest Karatsu ceramics undoubtedly were made in Korean style and according to Korean techniques. It is actually impossible to tell some contemporary Korean and Karatsu wares apart. The development of Karatsu was strongly stimulated by two invasions of Korea carried out during the closing years of the 16th century, after which Korean craftsmen were brought to Japan. Behind much of this development lay the popularity of the tea ceremony, which was sweeping Japan at this time. The Korean-style Kyushu wares were felt to be quite appropriate to the wabi-cha school of formal tea drinking.

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Universalium. 2010.

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