John Talaia


John Talaia

▪ Egyptian theologian and bishop

flourished 5th century

      theologian and bishop of Alexandria, Egypt, whose struggle to maintain his episcopal office and preserve the ascendancy of the orthodox party in conjunction with Popes Simplicius (468–483) and Felix III (483–492), against the incursion of Acacius, the heterodox patriarch of Constantinople, occasioned a temporary schism between Eastern and Western churches.

      A priest and majordomo of the church in Alexandria, John was recommended to the emperor Zeno (474–491) at Constantinople by Bishop Timothy of Alexandria to succeed him and thus continue orthodox rule. At the death of Timothy, John was duly elected (April 482) but was soon denounced by Patriarch Acacius as a Eutychian heretic (see Eutyches). John's denial resulted in a charge of perjury. Because of pressure from Zeno, he was forced to vacate the church of Alexandria and was replaced by one of Acacius' supporters, Petrus III Mongus.

      Later in 482 when Acacius wrote, under the authority of Zeno, the Henoticon (Greek: “Edict of Union”), a theological formula of Christian Trinitarian and Christological faith incorporating the decisions of the general councils of Nicaea (325) and of Constantinople (381), and after John sought redress from Pope Felix III, he excommunicated Acacius and his sect in 485 for failing to consult the Roman Church in the promulgation of the Henoticon. Schism was thus precipitated, although it ended in 519 when the emperor Justin I sought reconciliation. Nevertheless, it established an independent Byzantine church and activated a developing alienation that finally erupted in the definitive schism of 1054. John was never restored to Alexandria, but in 484 he was appointed bishop of Nola, Italy, where he soon died.

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Universalium. 2010.

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