Jamalzadah, Muhammad ʿAli


Jamalzadah, Muhammad ʿAli

▪ Iranian author
Jamalzadah also spelled  Jamāl-zādeh  or  Jamālzāda 
born Jan. 13, 1892, Eṣfahān, Iran
died Nov. 8, 1997, Geneva, Switz.

      Iranian prose writer who became one of the most important figures in 20th-century Persian literature.

      Although his father was a Muslim cleric, Jamalzadah was educated by Jesuits in Beirut, Lebanon. After earning his law degree at the University of Dijon in France, he returned to Iran in 1915 and briefly fought with a Kurdish force against the Allies in World War I. He soon moved back to Europe, eventually settling in Berlin. There he joined a group of Iranian nationalists opposed to foreign intervention in Iran and wrote for the respected periodical Kāva, which published his early stories and historical pieces. His first successful story, “Farsi shakar ast” (“Persian Is Sugar”), was reprinted in 1921/22 in Yakī būd yakī nabūd (Once Upon a Time), a collection of his short stories that laid the foundation for modern Persian prose. Yakī būd yakī nabūd caused a great stir, not only because of its innovative prose style, modern diction, and its use of colloquial Persian but also for its satiric, outspoken criticism of society—which aroused the anger of conservative Iranians. In the introduction to this collection—a highly influential manifesto—Jamalzadah argues the virtues of prose as a literary form, stating that prose is as vital as poetry to a nation's literature.

      For the next 20 years Jamalzadah pursued a nonliterary career. In 1931 he took a position in the International Labour Organisation in Geneva, a post he held for 25 years, during which time he made occasional visits to Iran. He also taught Persian at the University of Geneva. Most of Jamalzadah's writing was done during and after World War II. His satiric novel Dār al-majānīn (1942; “The Madhouse”) was followed by the novel Qultashan-i dīvān (1946; “The Custodian of the Divan”), a scathing attack on contemporary Iranian values and culture. Other important works include Rāh-yi āb-nāmah (1940; “The Story of the Water Channel”) and memoirs of his early years in Eṣfahān, Sar ū tah-e yak karbās yā Eṣfahān-nāme (1955; “The Beginning and End of a Web, or the Book of Eṣfahān”; Eng. trans. Isfahan Is Half the World: Memories of a Persian Boyhood). Jamalzadah also translated many literary works from English, German, and French into Persian and wrote a number of historical, sociopolitical, and economic tracts.

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Universalium. 2010.

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