Indonesian literatures


Indonesian literatures

      the poetry and prose writings in Javanese, Malay, Sundanese, and other languages of the peoples of Indonesia. They include works orally transmitted and then preserved in written form by the Indonesian peoples; oral literature; and the modern literatures that began to emerge in the early 20th century as the result of Western influence.

      Many of the Indonesian songs, or poems, that were orally transmitted by professional priest-singers embody traditions that have a religious function. Improvisation played a great part in this kind of poetry, and there is reason to believe that in its present form much of it is of no great age. Indonesian orally transmitted prose forms are highly varied and include myths, animal stories and “beast fables,” fairy tales, legends, puzzles and riddles, and anecdotes and adventure stories. The divine heroes and epic animals of these tales show the influence of Indian literature and the written literatures of other neighbouring cultures.

      Written literature in Indonesia has been preserved in the various languages of Sumatra (Achinese, Batak, Redjang, Lampong, and Malay), in the languages of Java (Sundanese and Madurese as well as Javanese), in Bali and Lombok, and in the more important languages of South Celebes (Makasarese and Buginese). By far the most important in both quantity and quality are the literatures in Javanese and Malay.

      The earliest extant examples of Javanese literature date from the 9th or 10th century CE. An important position in this early literature is occupied by Javanese prose and poetic versions of the two great Hindu epics, the Mahābhārata (Mahabharata) and the Rāmāyaṇa. The Javanese also borrowed from India's sophisticated court poetry in Sanskrit, in the process making it Javanese in expression, form, and feeling.

      When Islām reached Java in the 15th century, the mystical tendencies in it were incorporated by the Javanese into their own markedly mystical religious literature. Muslim influence was especially fertile during the early 17th century in Aceh, where Malay for the first time became an important written literary language. In Java, Muslim legends of saints were combined with Hindu-derived mythologies and cosmologies to produce strangely imaginative works of historical narrative in which magico-mystical elements play a prominent role.

      The Javanese and Malayan literatures declined under the impact of Dutch colonial domination in the 18th and 19th centuries. Only in the 20th century did a modern Indonesian literature arise, closely linked as it was to the nationalist movement and to the new ideal of a national language, Bahasa Indonesia. After 1920 a modern Indonesian literature rapidly came into existence. Muhammad Yamin and other prominent poets at this time were influenced by the forms and expressive modes of Romantic, Parnassian, and Symbolist verse from Europe. The first Indonesian novels also appeared in the 1920s and '30s; these were typical regional works by Abdul Muis and others in which the central theme is the struggle between the generations, between the stifling burden of traditionalism and the impulse for modern progress.

 In 1933, with the appearance of the review Pudjangga Baru (“The New Writer”), a new generation of intellectuals began to assess whether to maintain traditional values or to consciously accept Western norms in the effort to establish a modern but genuinely Indonesian culture. This discussion was interrupted by the Japanese occupation of Indonesia in 1942, which eventually broke up a generation that was still closely bound to Indonesia's colonial situation. With the Indonesian nationalist revolution of 1945, a new generation of fervently nationalistic and idealistic young writers who professed a universal humanism came to the forefront. Their inspiration and leader was the great poet Chairil Anwar, who died in 1949 at the age of 27. The most prominent writer to emerge at this time was Pramoedya Ananta Toer, whose support for the revolution led to his arrest in 1947 by Dutch colonial authorities. He wrote his first published novel, Perburuan (1950; The Fugitive), while imprisoned.

      The political climate changed radically after the violent events that surrounded Suharto's assumption of power in 1965–66. Strict government censorship was introduced, and many writers were either imprisoned or silenced. Continued restrictions on freedom of expression limited literary activity during the following decades, although these restrictions were eased somewhat after Suharto's resignation from the presidency, in 1998.

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Universalium. 2010.

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