Georgian Orthodox church


Georgian Orthodox church

      autocephalous (independent) church of the Orthodox communion in Georgia. The church is one of the most ancient Christian communities in the world. The Georgians adopted Christianity through the ministry of a woman, St. Nino, early in the 4th century. Thereafter, Georgia remained in the ecclesiastical sphere of Antioch and also under the influence of neighbouring Armenia. Its autocephaly was probably granted by the Eastern Roman emperor Zeno (474–491) with the consent of the patriarch of Antioch, Peter the Fuller. The heads of the Georgian (Georgia) church have since that time borne the title of catholicos.

      In the Middle Ages, Georgia experienced several periods of political expansion, during which the church developed remarkably rich traditions of art, architecture, and literature.

      In 1801, having been annexed by Russia, the country lost its political and ecclesiastical independence, and after 1817 the Georgian church was governed by Russian exarchs. During the Russian Revolution of 1917, the church reestablished its autocephalous catholicate. It was severely persecuted during the 1920s by the Soviet government, but under the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, a former Georgian seminarian, it seems to have enjoyed favourable treatment. In 1977, after the election of Catholicos Elias II, several vacant dioceses received new bishops, and a seminary, located in the historical seat of the catholicos in Mtskheta, was reorganized.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Georgian Orthodox Church — Georgian Apostolic Autocephalous Orthodox Church საქართველოს სამოციქულო ავტოკეფალური მართლმადიდებელი ეკლესია Coat of Arms Founder Apostle Andrew, Saint Nino …   Wikipedia

  • Eparchies of the Georgian Orthodox Church — As of 2007, the Georgian Orthodox and Apostolic Church is subdivided into thirty five eparchies: References *ge icon en icon ru icon [http://www.patriarchate.ge/?action=eparqiebi Official website of the Georgian Orthodox Church] *ge icon… …   Wikipedia

  • Georgian Catholic Church — On Georgian Catholics of Byzantine Rite, see Georgian Byzantine Rite CatholicsThe Georgian Catholic Church (or Catholic Church in Georgia) has always, since the East West Schism, been composed mainly of Latin Rite Catholics. Since the eighteenth… …   Wikipedia

  • Georgian Orthodox and Apostolic Church — {|style= float: right; Infobox Orthodox Church | show name = Georgian Apostolic Autocephalous Orthodox Church caption = Ascension of the Cross, 5th century Bas relief from the Jvari Monastery, Mtskheta, Georgia founder = Apostle Andrew, Saint… …   Wikipedia

  • Orthodox Church in America — Founder Independence 1970 Recognition Autocephalous by the …   Wikipedia

  • Eastern Orthodox Church — Orthodox Catholic Church and Orthodox Christian Church redirect here. For other uses of the term, see Orthodox (disambiguation). Not to be confused with Oriental Orthodox Churches. See also: Eastern Christianity and Orthodoxy by country The… …   Wikipedia

  • Bulgarian Orthodox Church — Българска православна църква Alexander Nevsky Cathedral, Sofia Founder Apostle Andrew, Boris I of Bulgaria Independence …   Wikipedia

  • History of the Eastern Orthodox Church — The Eastern Orthodox Churches trace their roots back to the Apostles and Jesus Christ. Eastern Orthodoxy reached its golden age during the high point of the Byzantine Empire, and then continued to flourish in Russia after the Fall of… …   Wikipedia

  • Eastern Orthodox church architecture — The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow, the world s tallest Orthodox church. An Orthodox church as a church building of Eastern Orthodoxy has a distinct, recognizable style among church architectures. C …   Wikipedia

  • Holy Orthodox Church in North America — The Holy Orthodox Church in North America or HOCNA is an Eastern Orthodox Christian church located primarily in the United States and Canada, with additional communities in Europe and Africa. Originally part of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.