General Federation of Women's Clubs International


General Federation of Women's Clubs International

      umbrella organization in the United States founded in 1890 to coordinate its members' efforts at promoting volunteer community service. During its more than century-long existence, the federation has focused its activities on areas such as the arts, the environment, education, and family and childhood issues.

      The GFWC had its origins in 1890, when Sorosis, a women's literary club founded by journalist Jane Cunningham Croly (Croly, Jane Cunningham), issued invitations to other women's literary clubs to form an umbrella organization with the goal of uniting “women's clubs to enhance community service by volunteers throughout the world.” The resultant body elected Charlotte Emerson Brown (Brown, Charlotte Emerson) as its first president. Five thousand clubs had joined by 1906 and had embraced the GFWC's national agenda. The organization's goals included the establishment of an eight-hour workday, an end to child labour, the reform of civil service, and conservation. One of the group's important early victories was a massive letter-writing campaign that was instrumental in passing the Pure Food and Drug Act. For some years in the early 1900s, the GFWC was the largest national women's organization before being overtaken in membership by the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Its national membership peaked at 1,700,000 in 1914, the same year the organization finally agreed to lend its support to the suffrage movement.

      During the 20th century the GFWC remained dedicated to community-based volunteer service. Major achievements of the GFWC include establishing a large number of public libraries, assisting in the passage of child labour laws, and helping establish the National Park Service. During the 1990s, with local clubs in all 50 states and in more than 20 countries, the organization addressed such issues as literacy, discrimination against women, family and child welfare, and world hunger.

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Universalium. 2010.

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