Foxe, John


Foxe, John

▪ British clergyman
born 1516, Boston, Lincolnshire, Eng.
died April 18, 1587, Cripplegate, London

      English Puritan preacher and author of The Book of Martyrs, a graphic and polemic account of those who suffered for the cause of Protestantism. Widely read, often the most valued book beside the Bible in the households of English Puritans, it helped shape popular opinion about Roman Catholicism for at least a century. The feeling of the English populace against Spain, important in the politics of the age, was fanned by the book's description of the Inquisition. It dealt chiefly, however, with the martyrdom of English Protestants from the 14th century through the reign of Queen Mary I in Foxe's own time.

      After studying at the University of Oxford and holding a fellowship for seven years, Foxe fell under suspicion of harbouring Protestant views more extreme than the authorities of his college would allow. He resigned and in 1547 moved to London, where he became tutor to the grandchildren of the duke of Norfolk. He was ordained a deacon of the Church of England. Foxe worked for the Reformation, writing several tracts. He also began his account of martyrs but had carried it no further than 1500 when the accession of the Roman Catholic queen Mary I in 1553 forced him to flee overseas. In Strasbourg, France, he published his partly completed martyrology in Latin as Commentarii rerum in ecclesia gestarum (1554; “Commentaries on Affairs Within the Church”). He then went to Frankfurt, where he lent a moderating support to the Calvinistic party of John Knox, and thence to Basel, Switz., where he wrote a burning appeal to the English nobility to restrain the queen from persecuting Protestants: Ad inclytos ac praepotentes Angliae proceres (“To the Renowned and Powerful Nobles of England,” 1557). With the aid of manuscripts sent to him from England, he carried his account of the martyrs up to 1556 and had it printed in 1559, the year following the accession to the throne of the Protestant queen, Elizabeth I.

      Foxe returned to London and devoted himself to the completion of his great work. Perusing official registers and using the memories of eyewitnesses, he enlarged his story. His English translation was printed in March 1563 under the title Actes and Monuments of these Latter and Perillous Dayes. It immediately acquired the popular name The Book of Martyrs. In 1570 he produced his greatly improved second edition. This was the crown of his achievement; he made few changes in his third (1576) and fourth (1583) editions.

      Foxe was ordained an Anglican priest in 1560, but having Puritan scruples he refused all offices, obtaining two church stipends that required no duties. He often preached, however, and a sermon delivered at Paul's Cross (A Sermon, Of Christ Crucified [1570]) had a wide sale. In the plague of 1563 he ministered to the victims and wrote a moving tract of consolation. When Anabaptists in 1575 and Jesuits in 1581 were condemned to death, Foxe wrote vehement letters to Queen Elizabeth and her councilors, begging reprieves.

      Foxe's monument is his book. It has been criticized as prolix, carelessly edited, one-sided, sometimes credulous, but it is factually detailed and preserves much firsthand material on the English Reformation unobtainable elsewhere.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • FOXE, John — (1517 1587) John Foxe was a zealous proponent of the English Reformation, renowned as the compiler of Acts and Monuments of These Latter and Perilous Days (first edition, 1563), known popularly as The Book of Martyrs. This monumental collection… …   Renaissance and Reformation 1500-1620: A Biographical Dictionary

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  • Foxe, John —  (1516–1587) English clergyman, most remembered for the book commonly known as Foxe’s Book of Martyrs; not to be confused with George Fox (1624–1691), founder of the Society of Friends, or Quakers …   Bryson’s dictionary for writers and editors

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  • FOXE, JOHN —    martyrologist, born at Boston, Lincolnshire; in 1545 he resigned his Fellowship in Magdalen College, Oxford, on account of his espousing the doctrines of the Reformation, and for some years after he acted as a private tutor in noble families;… …   The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

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