exchange, bill of


exchange, bill of

also called  draft  or  draught 

      short-term negotiable financial instrument consisting of an order in writing addressed by one person (the seller of goods) to another (the buyer) requiring the latter to pay on demand (a sight draft) or at a fixed or determinable future time (a time draft) a certain sum of money to a specified person or to the bearer of the bill.

      The bill of exchange originated as a method of settling accounts in international trade. Arab merchants used a similar instrument as early as the 8th century AD, and the bill in its present form attained wide use during the 13th century among the Lombards of northern Italy, who carried on considerable foreign commerce. Because merchants (the buyers) usually retained their assets in banks in a number of trading cities, a shipper of goods (the seller) could obtain immediate payment from a banker by presenting a bill of exchange signed by the buyer (who, in so doing, had accepted liability for payment when due). The banker would purchase the bill at a discount from its full amount because payment was due at a future date; the purchasing merchant's account would be debited when the bill became due. Bills could also be drawn directly on the banks themselves. After the seller received his payment, the bill of exchange continued to function as a credit instrument until its maturity, independent of the original transaction.

      Bills of exchange are sometimes called drafts, but that term usually applies to domestic transactions only. The term bill of exchange may also be applied more broadly to other instruments of foreign exchange, including cable and mail transfers, traveler's checks, letters of credit, postal money orders, and express orders.

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Universalium. 2010.

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