Doric dialect


Doric dialect

also called  West Greek,  

      a dialect of Ancient Greek that in Mycenaean times was spoken by seminomadic Greeks living around the Pindus Mountains. After the Dorian migrations near the end of the 2nd millennium BC, Doric-speaking Greeks were found in the northwest of Greece as well as throughout the Peloponnese (except Arcadia) and the islands of the South Aegean (Crete, Thera, Rhodes, Cos). Outside the Aegean world, important Doric colonies were founded by Doric cities: Syracuse was established by Corinth (c. 734 BC), Tarentum by Sparta (c.700 BC), Cyrene by Thera (c. 630 BC). In Hellenistic times, several supraregional Doric standard dialects developed. The Doric Koine of the Peloponnese under the Achaean League was based on the dialect of Corinth and Sicyon, the Northwest Koine of the Aetolian League on that of Aetolia, the Sicilian Koine on that of Syracuse, and the South Italic Koine on that of Tarentum.

      The artificial dialect of literary choral lyric is Doric interspersed with Ionic epic and some Lesbian poetry. Its first poet was Eumelus of Corinth (8th century BC). The type of Doric used by Alcman (fl. late 7th century BC) is very similar to his Laconian vernacular (Laconia is the area around Sparta). From the time of Simonides of Ceos and Pindar (c. 500 BC) onward, many Doric elements are replaced by Ionic epic elements. This later form of Lyric-Doric is also found in the lyric parts of Attic tragedy. The Syracusan variety of Doric is used in the comedies of Epicharmus, the mimes of Sophron, and later in the scientific prose of Archimedes. The Tarentan variety is found in the works of the Pythagoreans Archytas of Tarentum and Philolaos. The Doric dialect found in Theocritus' idylls is often considered an artificial mixture of several varieties of Doric found in poetry, but it may well represent the type of Doric spoken in Alexandria and Egypt during the first half of the 3rd century BC by Greeks of Cyrenaean origin.

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