cyclic form


cyclic form

music
      in music, any compositional form characterized by the repetition, in a later movement or part of the piece, of motives, themes, or whole sections from an earlier movement in order to unify structure. The need for such a device arose during the 19th century, when the traditional classical restraint of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Joseph Haydn yielded to ever greater extremes, emotionally as well as formally—when, in fact, the romantic novel superseded classical drama as the basic model for instrumental music.

      There are early examples of a type of cyclic technique in Mozart's Horn Concerto No. 3 (1784–87?). But the frequent use of recurrent material in large-scale works begins with Beethoven's Fifth Symphony (1808), in which movements are bound together by a recurring motive as well as by literal repetition of a sizable section of music.

      Cyclic technique permeates many works of the generation following Beethoven—e.g., the Wanderer Fantasy of Franz Schubert and the Symphony No. 4 of Robert Schumann, in which the cyclic material is extensively melodic rather than motivic (using brief melodic-rhythmic fragments). This tendency culminated in the idée fixe (literally, “fixed idea”), or recurrent theme, of the French composer Hector Berlioz. In his Harold en Italie the theme returns each time in much the same form, but in the Symphonie fantastique it takes on a different character in each movement.

      The latter method of thematic transformation appealed especially to Franz Liszt (Liszt, Franz), who based whole works on this principle of using a single theme in vastly different guises, for example in his Piano Concerto No. 2 and Sonata in B Minor.

      A kind of cyclic school arose for a time among Liszt's disciples, especially the Franco-Belgian composer César Franck, whose techniques were well publicized by his pupil Vincent d'Indy. Subsequent composers, however, used the cyclic technique as only one, and often not the most important, means of unifying a piece of music.

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Universalium. 2010.

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