Cosmic Background Explorer


Cosmic Background Explorer

▪ United States satellite
      U.S. satellite placed in Earth orbit in 1989 to map the “smoothness” of the cosmic background radiation (Cosmos) field and, by extension, to confirm the validity of the big bang (big-bang model) theory of the origin of the universe.

      In 1964 Arno Penzias (Penzias, Arno) and Robert Wilson (Wilson, Robert Woodrow), working together at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey to calibrate a large microwave antenna prior to using it to monitor radio-frequency emissions from space, discovered the presence of microwave radiation that seemed to permeate the cosmos uniformly. Now known as the cosmic background radiation, this uniform field provided spectacular support for the big bang model, which held that the early universe was very hot and the subsequent expansion of the universe would redshift (red shift) the thermal radiation of the early universe to much longer wavelengths corresponding to much cooler thermal radiation. Penzias and Wilson shared a Nobel Prize for Physics in 1978 for their discovery, but, in order to test the theory of the early history of the universe, cosmologists needed to know whether the radiation field was isotropic (that is, the same in every direction) or anisotropic (that is, having spatial variation).

      The 2,200-kg (4,900-pound) COBE satellite was launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration on a Delta rocket on Nov. 18, 1989, to make these fundamental observations. COBE's Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) was able to measure the spectrum of the radiation field 100 times more accurately than had previously been possible using balloon-borne detectors in Earth's atmosphere, and in so doing it confirmed that the spectrum of the radiation precisely matched what had been predicted by the theory. The Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) produced an all-sky survey that showed “wrinkles” indicating that the field was isotropic to 1 part in 100,000. Although this may seem minor, the fact that the big bang gave rise to a universe that was slightly denser in some places than in others would have stimulated gravitational separation and, ultimately, the formation of galaxies (galaxy). COBE's Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment measured radiation from the formation of the earliest galaxies. After four years of observations, the COBE mission was ended, but the satellite remained in orbit.

      In 2006 John Mather (Mather, John C.), COBE project scientist and FIRAS team leader, and George Smoot (Smoot, George F.), DMR principal investigator, won the Nobel Prize for Physics for the FIRAS and DMR results.

David M. Harland
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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