Coptic literature


Coptic literature

      body of writings, almost entirely religious, that dates from the 2nd century, when the Coptic language of Egypt, the last stage of ancient Egyptian, began to be used as a literary language, until its decline in the 7th and 8th centuries. It contains, in addition to translations from the Greek, original writings by the Greek Fathers and founders of Eastern monasticism and texts throwing light on early Gnosticism and Manichaeism within the Christian church.

      The earliest original writings in Coptic were the letters by St. Anthony of Egypt, first of the “Desert Fathers.” During the 3rd and 4th centuries many ecclesiastics and monks wrote in Coptic, among them St. Pachomius (Pachomius, Saint), whose monastic rule (the first cenobitic rule, for solitary monks gathered in communities) survives only in Coptic; St. Athanasius (Athanasius, Saint), the first patriarch of Alexandria to use Coptic, as well as Greek, for didactic homilies; Macarius (Macarius the Egyptian) (the Elder) of Egypt, a famous ascetic desert solitary; and St. Serapion, bishop of Thmuis, whose liturgical texts are a valuable source for early church worship. The first to realize fully the language's literary potentialities was Shenute (c. 360–450), abbot of the White Monastery, near Atripe, Upper Egypt. In sermons, treatises, and homilies, he showed mastery of style and the forceful character that made him (though unknown in the West until the 20th century) the most influential personality of his period in Egypt, where he is still regarded as a saint. His works remain the outstanding original writings in Coptic, equaled in intensity only by 7th- and 8th-century hymns sung antiphonally to traditional tunes and written to encourage the Coptic Christians during the persecutions that followed the 7th-century Muslim invasions.

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Universalium. 2010.

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