compressive strength test


compressive strength test

      mechanical test measuring the maximum amount of compressive load a material can bear before fracturing. The test piece, usually in the form of a cube, prism, or cylinder, is compressed between the platens of a compression-testing machine by a gradually applied load.

      Brittle materials such as rock, brick, cast iron, and concrete may exhibit great compressive strengths; but ultimately they fracture. The crushing strength of concrete, determined by breaking a cube, and often called the cube strength, reaches values of about 3 tons per square inch, that of granite 10 tons per square inch, and that of cast iron from 25 to 60 tons per square inch.

      Some ductile metals, such as mild steel, have very great compressive strengths; but the actual values are difficult to measure. When a load is applied to a ductile metal, it deforms elastically up to a certain point, and then plastic deformation occurs. Increasing loads may even completely flatten a test piece without any definite fracture occurring, so that no value can be obtained for the compressive strength. The custom of quoting tensile-strength values in these cases is inaccurate but safe, compressive strength being always greater.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Compressive strength — is the capacity of a material or structure to withstand axially directed pushing forces. When the limit of compressive strength is reached, materials are crushed. Concrete can be made to have high compressive strength, e.g. many concrete… …   Wikipedia

  • Strength of materials — Internal force lines are denser near the hole, a common stress concentration In materials science, the strength of a material is its ability to withstand an applied stress without failure. The applied stress may be tensile, compressive, or shear …   Wikipedia

  • Strength of ships — The strength of ships is a topic of key interest to Naval Architects and shipbuilders. Ships which are built too strong are heavy, slow, and cost extra money to build and operate since they weigh more, whilst ships which are built too weakly… …   Wikipedia

  • Container compression test — The container compression test measures the compressive strength of packages such as boxes, drums, and cans. It usually provides a plot of deformation vs compressive force. It is commonly used to evaluate shipping containers made of corrugated… …   Wikipedia

  • Tensile strength — sigma {UTS}, or S U is the stress at which a material breaks or permanently deforms. Tensile strength is an intensive property and, consequently, does not depend on the size of the test specimen. However, it is dependent on the preparation of the …   Wikipedia

  • Flexural strength — Flexural strength, also known as modulus of rupture, bend strength, or fracture strength,[dubious – discuss] a mechanical parameter for brittle material, is defined as a material s ability to resist deformation under load. The transverse bending… …   Wikipedia

  • Trinity (nuclear test) — For other uses, see Trinity (disambiguation). Trinity The Trinity explosion, 0.016 seconds after detonation. The fireball is about 600 feet (200 m) wide. The black specks silhouetted along the horizon are trees. Information Country… …   Wikipedia

  • materials testing — Introduction       measurement of the characteristics and behaviour of such substances as metals, ceramics, or plastics under various conditions. The data thus obtained can be used in specifying the suitability of materials for various… …   Universalium

  • Properties of concrete — Concrete has relatively high compressive strength, but significantly lower tensile strength, and as such is usually reinforced with materials that are strong in tension (often steel). The elasticity of concrete is relatively constant at low… …   Wikipedia

  • Concrete — This article is about the construction material. For other uses, see Concrete (disambiguation). Outer view of the Roman Pantheon, still the largest unreinforced solid concrete dome.[1] …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.